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About the boot/resume latency of booting device....

Posted on 2013-01-21
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Last Modified: 2013-11-14
Hi Experts,

I have some questions about the boot device...(We want to develop storage device and use it as the "boot device"...) Maybe you can give me some comments....  

1. We want to know if there is any document or spec defining the max boot latency ? Here the latency is calculated from Power button is pressed to Windows Logo appearance

2. If we complete our own storage device and want to use it as boot device, then how do we know if it is "qualified" regarding the speed ? Here the speed indicates the device's response to host's requests...

Ex. maybe the device is slow in response to requests thus host has to wait for it for a long time...

3. The same question is applied to the system hibernation(S4)...Does anyone(Ex. Microsoft) define this max resume latency ?

Regards,
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Question by:liaoo
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by:Davis McCarn
Davis McCarn earned 500 total points
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Windows XP and newer allow ten seconds for spinup or resume which applies to all power states.  Different O/S' may have shorter timeout values; but, most of them have patches to allow for changeing the value.
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by:liaoo
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Hi DavisMcCarn,
According to your comments, I have 3 further questions and maybe you can help me to clarify them...

1.

Does this latency(10 sec or shorter) apply to the storage device ONLY ? right ? ( That is, the maximum latency for boot device to respond to 1st request is 10 sec, right ? )

2.

If above is yes, then could you tell me how to find the document or specification in which this latency(10 sec) is defined ?

3.

As for the patch you said, could you guide me how to find this kind of patch ?
* Be more specific will be better... Thanks !
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Davis McCarn earned 500 total points
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Yes, the 10 second timeout applies to IDE, ATA, ATAPI, and SCSI storage devices; but, you'll have to emulate one of those to boot.
MS article with 10 second timeout for XP+ and patch for 2K: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/817472
Linux man page to get/set parameters: http://linux.die.net/man/8/hdparm
Link to ATA standards documentation: http://hddguru.com/documentation/
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by:liaoo
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Hi DavisMcCarn,

For the 1st link, I found this hotfix(or patch) is only applied to the case "resumes from standby". Besides the requirement to use this hotfix is "after multiple time-out or CRC errors occur the transfer mode will be reduced to lower speed"

What I want to know is: for BOTH boot and resume from standby does any spec/doc define the max latency for hard drive to respond to request...This is the drive's capability and we want to speed-up if not qualified...

But at least I found below words maybe useful:
In Windows 2000 only, read requests to ATA disks are sometimes issued with a time-out value of 4 seconds. This occurs when your computer resumes from standby. This might cause a disk time-out because drives typically take more than 4 seconds to spin up. This time-out value was changed to 10 seconds.

In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, this time-out value is always 10 seconds

For the 2nd link, I think this command-line interface is not what I want because one of its function is to set the standby (spindown) timeout for the drive. But I found below words maybe useful...
Put the drive into idle (low-power) mode, and also set the standby (spindown) timeout for the drive. This timeout value is used by the drive to determine how long to wait (with no disk activity) before turning off the spindle motor to save power. Under such circumstances, the drive may take as long as 30 seconds to respond to a subsequent disk access, though most drives are much quicker

As for the 3rd link, after downloading 2 PDF files I did not found "this kind" of timing constrains...

Anyway thanks for your information and please comments if I was wrong...
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