Reverse DNS SMTP banner mismatch

Hello,

I have an Exchange 2010 server install.  The hub transport is on the same server as the mailbox. I have a sendconnector configured with the proper FQDN.

I have two receive connectors.. a default and a client.

The default receive connector  has FQDN   mydomain.local

In my reading Microsoft recommends not changing the FQDN in the default receive connector.  

So my question is how do I get my receive connector to report the proper FDQN.?

I assume I use some kind of exchange cmdlet to set this option but I'm new to these cmdlets and their functions.

any help would be appreciated..
magnav30Asked:
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Simon Butler (Sembee)Connect With a Mentor ConsultantCommented:
Don't change anything.
That is the expected behaviour on the automated tests because Exchange announces one thing for inbound email and another for outbound. Outbound is the only valid which the automated tests cannot test for.

Simon.
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Suliman Abu KharroubIT Consultant Commented:
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magnav30Author Commented:
Simon,

My emails are being flagged as spam?  which they weren't before I converted to exch2010.

Sulimanw,


I think your link is the correct way to change the fqdn.  When I run the set-receiveconnector command and I try to set a banner.  I get an error that the says default receive connector is not found on my server.  (Except it says it can't find it on one of my old exchange 2003 servers?  Why would a set-receiveconnector command be looking @ an old exchange server?  The default receive connector is on my new Exch2010 box.

I still have yet uninstalled the 2003 servers.
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Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Simon is 100% correct - the FQDN on the Receive Connector doesn't need to be changed.

No-one cares what your Receive Connector is called because when they send mail to you, they don't need to check if you are a spammer - only your SEND connector FQDN is important and that is set correctly.

Alan
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
It should also be noted that changing the FQDN on the Receive Connector can stop other things from working. The Microsoft guidance for the FQDN is that it should be either null, the server's NETBIOS name, or the server's FQDN, not some other FQDN.

Simon.
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magnav30Author Commented:
yes.. I understand.. So we are to ignore the mxtoolbox reverse smtp banner mismatch error?

This doesn't make any sense?  this all worked when I had Windows 2003.  I passed the reverse dns mismatch test back when I had exchange 2003?

My send connector has the proper FQDN... yet my sending emails are going to junk for many .

My received mail header shows that the email was received from the proper mx record but also shows my .local mail server info as well as originating local ip address.  This seems odd to me?  Why would the header show all that information?  Is that just how SMTP works.
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Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Exchange 2003 sent and received using the same SMTP virtual server.  Exchange 2007 on uses different connectors for sending and receiving which is why the mxtoolbox test worked on Exchange 2003 but doesn't work for Exchange 2007 onwards.

Alan
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magnav30Author Commented:
Thanks Alan.. that helps me understand lots.
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Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
You are welcome.  On my server I see the following from MXToolbox:

MXToolbox Output
Yet I don't have any problems sending or receiving.
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magnav30Author Commented:
I'm thinking I need to look into a SPF configuration as well..??
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Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
You can - but that should be the subject of another question as this one is about Reverse DNS / SMTP Banner Mismatch.
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Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Comment https:#a38812516 should be accepted as the correct answer.

Alan
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