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Networking of two different subnets, 192.168.4.# and 192.168.5.#

I need to setup two different networks, but need to be able for the computers on the 192.168.4.# side talk to the 192.168.5.# side.  

I would like to use the cheaper Netgear prosafe routers/switches.  So any part numbers here would help also.  I have two Netgear Prosafe smart switches  GS108T, maybe these would work?

How can I go about setting this up?
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keith1001
Asked:
keith1001
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2 Solutions
 
mcsweenSr. Network AdministratorCommented:
It depends on if you are using a class C (255.255.255.0) or class B (255.255.0.0) subnet.  If you are using class B then just set everything up and be done with it, no routing required.

If you are going to use a class C you will have to put a router or layer 3 switch in the mix and turn on IP routing.  You shouldn't need a static route setup on the router/switch as it will have both subnets directly connected just make sure at least 1 interface is addressed on each network.

Router/L3 Switch connected to both networks with IP addresses 192.168.4.1 and 192.168.5.1.  192.168.4.x clients get 192.168.4.1 as their gateway and 192.168.5.x clients get 5.1 as their gateway.
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keith1001Author Commented:
What would be the disadvantage going with the Class B?


then if I go with Class C, I need to make sure my switch can have two IP addresses or that just one computer on each side of each switch has an IP address of 192.168.4.# and 192.168.5.#?
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mcsweenSr. Network AdministratorCommented:
There really isn't a disadvantage to going with class B except it is a much larger address space than class C.

You have to have a LAYER 3 switch if you are going to route on a switch and IP Routing must be turned on.  You would create two vlans, lets say VLAN 40 and VLAN 50.  You would assign 192.168.4.1 to VLAN 40 and 192.168.5.1 to VLAN 50.  Then you would assign the appropriate VLAN to each port depending on if you are plugging in a 4.x client or 5.x client.  You would also want a default route on the switch to your internet gateway (firewall).

If you aren't familiar with routing networks I would just assign a class B (255.255.0.0) subnet to these and use your firewall as the default gateway.
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Fred MarshallCommented:
What's being discussed here is "how big is the subnet?"  But you started by saying that there were (two subnets" (well, really "two different networks") and not "two address ranges" in use.

You also said that you wanted
computers on the 192.168.4.# side talk to the 192.168.5.# side.  
You didn't really say if you wanted computers on the 192.168.5.# side talk to the 192.168.4.# side.  It's not necessarily a silly distinction.

I don't think you're going to do this unless you have a fancy switch or a router.

So it would be good to have the objectives clear before launching off into solutions.
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mat1458Commented:
As you have an 8 port switch probably the size of the network is no issue. You have several possiblities:

-Lower the network mask on all devices (255.255.254.0 or even 255.255.0.0) and probably adjust the default gateway for all 192.168.5.x systems. (This is what was called Class C and Class B before but is rather classless IP addressing.)

-Get a layer 3 switch (i.e. GSM... switches of netgear) or a router/firewall to route between the two subnets. Your GS108T is a L2 switch that does not have any routing possibilities. But maybe you already have a router or a firewall in your network that could do the routing. Is there a device that acts as default gateway for one/both VLAN?
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keith1001Author Commented:
mat1458,  right now there is no devices that acts as a default gateway.

I will have two Dell swtiches 2948, they will be on the 192.168.4.# side.  I have a around 80 computers on those switches.  These computers themselves dosnt need to talk to the 192.168.5.# computers.   But i do have one computer on the 192.168.4.# that needs to talk to all the 192.168.4.# and also the 192.168.5#.

The 192.168.5.# will just have a standard switch with about 15 devices on it.  

The two netgears i mention in my first post, was hoping i could use those as the router/switches.

So i will have one cable running from 192.168.4.# to the 192.168.5.#, just need to figure out what devices i need to do the above talking?
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mat1458Commented:
So do it that way: decrease the subnet mask on the one 192.168.4.x system that has to communicate to 192.168.5.x to at least 255.255.254.0 (or even more). Do the same for all 192.168.5.x systems. Then you're all set. The Netgears as I said can't be used for routing nor can the Dell's.
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keith1001Author Commented:
mat1458, so really i would not need any routers to do any routes, if i have both 192.168.4.# and 192.168.5.#  on 255.255.254.0, correct?

Since i really dont have a gateway/main router, what should i use on the PC's for the gateway?
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mat1458Commented:
>mat1458, so really i would not need any routers to do any routes, if i have both 192.168.4.# >and 192.168.5.#  on 255.255.254.0, correct?
you only need the one system in 192.168.4.x that needs to communicate with 192.168.5.x and all 192.168.5.x systems have the mask 255.255.254.0

>Since i really dont have a gateway/main router, what should i use on the PC's for the >gateway?
Nothing. Leave it blank.
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keith1001Author Commented:
Thanks guys, set the network up like you suggested and all is fine.
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