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SQL Server 2008 - finding data source

Posted on 2013-01-25
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Last Modified: 2013-02-05
Hi and thanks for any help


This may be a basic question?

I am trying to find were the data is coming from in SQL.

Say I am looking at a screen and I see the data that I need or want to find in a table.

I want to see were that data (that is on the screen) is being placed (what table), when the user inputs that data.

I know in Access you open a screen then you have the design view were you can right click, click on properties and then you are able to see the link to that field.  That way you can find the correct table.

I want to be able to do the samething in SQL?

Please help and Thanks
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Question by:Amour22015
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Assisted Solution

by:ParrotRob2
ParrotRob2 earned 250 total points
ID: 38819751
That would depend on what you're looking at, and probably won't be readily available through the application.  The best thing to do is to trace it at the database server.  You can filter the trace by the user or computer making the request (issuing the SQL commands).  From this, you can analyze the select, insert, update or delete being issued or the procedure being executed.
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Accepted Solution

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David Todd earned 250 total points
ID: 38823575
Hi,

Sometimes, you can have grids and tables in applications that is fairly tightly bound to datasets which are bound to tables, and yes, for those applications, somewhere in the properties, you'll be able to discover that. But that is a MS Visual Basic/MS Visual C# trick, not necessarily a SQL one. Also by definition, since a normalised table contains only one fact per row, it takes a few tables, and maybe a few more rows to store the information that is on a screen, so maybe not.

However, in SSMS, you can fairly easily drill into each table and extract the data. But again, since in a normalised database, each table has one fact per row, it can take a few tables with several rows to flesh out something like a sales order ...

Is this just out of curiosity,  or is there more to this question? Is there something specific that you are trying to solve?

HTH
  David
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Author Comment

by:Amour22015
ID: 38826643
Hi,

It is out of curiosity,

I just want to find if there is a way to follow the flow of a program.

Like in Access you can go into design view right click on the screen/form and see what table it is linked to.


Thanks
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Author Closing Comment

by:Amour22015
ID: 38855176
I guess there is no easy solution, Thanks for you help.
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