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Microsoft Access ODBC in both 32 and 64 bit OS environments

Posted on 2013-01-25
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Last Modified: 2013-01-28
Hey experts! I have a client who has users with both 32 and 64 bit OS's. They have 32 bit Office installed universally.

For non-terminal server (TS) users everything works fine... for the 64-bit Terminal Server users however, the ODBC connection is not working.

When logging into TS as administrator we open Windows\SysWow64\odbcad32.exe and see the connection and can test it successfully.

From within the Access application however, when I try to link to the ODBC table it only brings up the non 64-bit odbc driver.

Any suggestions??
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Question by:Ei0914
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 38821773
Try creating the link from within Access, instead of using the odbcad32.exe utility. You can set it as a "Machine Data Source", which should expose it to everyone using the TS box (but if not, you'd just have to rebuild on each TS user).

Better yet, don't even use a DSN, and instead relink the tables with DSN-less connections:

http://www.accessmvp.com/djsteele/DSNLessLinks.html

It's a little more work, but much more robust. I've used this technique for many, many years with great success on many different platforms (including TS).
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Author Closing Comment

by:Ei0914
ID: 38827200
Thanks a lot!!!
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