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Network

What is the maximum length of data transfer for copper cables.
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hajisa
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hajisa
5 Solutions
 
IanThCommented:
copper cables ? there are loads and that's relevant you see cat 5a was designed for 100 but can in very limited mode do 1 gig where as cat 6 as it is shielded so it can go further so i think you question should have been I need a cable to do 100 meters at 1gb as you can get boosters to extend the reach I have seen cat 6 go up to 120 meters.
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nsonbatyCommented:
You're asking the wrong question. For starters, copper wire by itself doesn't transfer data. It's just a conductive material. Even if you were talking about data speed, you'd be referring to the impedence of the wire vs the electrons flowing through it (this speed approaches the speed of light). However, you cannot measure bits-per-second over a copper wire. I suppose there is a theoretical limit, but I'm pretty sure that's not what you mean.

However, for example ; Copper works on simple ADSL connections since there is not much of a distance from a modem to a phone jack on a wall. Copper usually transmits data without loss at distances of two kilometers or less. On top of all that, the demand for bandwidth in an ADSL connection is often low enough (around 6 to 8 Mbps on average) to use copper wires.

Wish that would help you find your answer.
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stirlingfaCommented:
I assume you are asking for the maximum cable length for Ethernet cable runs.
I would not recommend installing anything longer than 100m. If you do run a cable over 120 meters and it fails what are you going to do? The spec for 100 meters is there for your guidance.
Cheers
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Darr247Commented:
Depending how you parse the question, the answer could be "9000 bytes, using Jumbo Frames."  Or, data used to be transfered under the oceans to other continents over copper cables, so "thousands of miles."

For the ethernet physical layer, 802.3 specifies 100m maximum, and jack-to-jack it's recommended to use a maximum of 90m, leaving 5m on each end for patch cables.

You *can* go further than spec, but the network will slow down because of errors (many are not actual errors, but simply Ack timeouts occurring which result in packets being resent), because faster-than-light communication hasn't been invented yet.
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hajisaAuthor Commented:
very good
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