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Graphing :  Which is best Access or Excel

Posted on 2013-01-27
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Last Modified: 2013-01-27
Hi,

Hi I will be developing a fairly simple (smallish) Access database.

IN order to impress (!) my client I will be including a lot of graphs.

I find Access graphing a bit awkward (perhaps it's me?).
I find Excel graphing friendlier and easier.

So, I think I may develop in Access and use msquery in Excel to display the data in graph format etc.

Is Excel better at graphing?
Is the above approach sensible?
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Question by:Patrick O'Dea
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LVL 48

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by:
Dale Fye earned 350 total points
ID: 38824590
I personally find Access graphs to be clunky, but I have not had much need to play with them much since I moved to 2007, so I don't know whether the 2007/10/13 graph capabilities have improved much.

When I was doing a lot of graphs, I generally tended to use your Excel with msquery technique, or used Excel automation to push recordsets to Excel, and then change the Excel graph properties from within Access.  

The up side of the latter technique was that I didn't have a lot of links that had to be refreshed; the down side was that the user of the Excel workbook was not able to update whenever they wanted, without running the Access application.
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LVL 120

Assisted Solution

by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
Rey Obrero (Capricorn1) earned 150 total points
ID: 38824591
yes, i do the same.
it is a lot easier to format the graphs in excel.
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Author Comment

by:Patrick O'Dea
ID: 38824728
Experts, thanks for your views.

Fyed, could you expand very briefly on your comments if possible. How do i do this ... Just give me a pointer and i can figure it out. See below

"or used Excel automation to push recordsets to Excel, and then change the Excel graph properties from within Access."
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LVL 48

Expert Comment

by:Dale Fye
ID: 38824875
It has been quite a while since I have done this.

Pushing the data to Excel via automation is done by declaring Excel objects in your code, using either the CreateObject or GetObject method to open a current instance of Excel, or open a new one.

The Excel Worksheet method CopyFromRecordset is used to paste an Access recordset into Excel, using syntax similar to:

sht.Range("A2").CopyFromRecordset rs

I cannot find any code examples at the moment for manipulating the Excel chart object from code, but the easiest way to do that is to record a macro, then play around with the chart, then stop recording and view the code associated with the macro.  It is not always the most efficient, but you can generally post here at EE in the Access and Excel topic areas to get good answers on the specifics.  Actually, I would not be at all surprised if you searched EE on 'Excel Chart VBA' or something like that you would get quite a few hits.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Patrick O'Dea
ID: 38824915
Thanks folks,<br /><br />great as ever!
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