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What does [\d\.]+$ mean?

I have this script:

Add-PSSnapin Quest.ActiveRoles.ADManagement

$User=Read-Host "Search for a User by: First, Last, or UserName"

Get-QADUser $User | Format-Table Name, UserPrincipalName,PasswordAge,PasswordLastSet,PasswordExpires,AccountisLockedOut -AutoSize

function isNumeric ($User) {
    try {
        0 + $User | Out-Null
        return $true
    } catch {
        return $false
    }
}

if ($user -match "[\d\.]+$"){
Set-QADUser $User -UserPassword password11 -WhatIf
Unlock-QADUser $User -WhatIf
}

else {
$UserPrincipalName= Read-Host "What is the user's Pin number?"
Set-QADUser $UserPrincipalName -UserPassword test-WhatIf
Unlock-QADUser $UserPrincipalName -WhatIf
}

Open in new window


And I wanted to check if the user input is a number. I found "[\d\.]+$" on another site as a way of checking this. That code works but I have no idea what it means.

Can someone explain this? I am sorry if this is a stupid question...
0
Joseph Moody
Asked:
Joseph Moody
6 Solutions
 
ScriptAddictCommented:
That looks like a regular expression to me.  

http://www.regular-expressions.info/
0
 
kmslogicCommented:
It's a regular expression.  The part in square brackets is a portion of the pattern which means match a single digit [\d.]  and the + after that means that pattern can repeat any number of times.  The $ at the end represents the end of line.
0
 
Jeff DarlingDeveloper AnalystCommented:
That is a regular expression that matches when the value is a number or a period.

you can try it out here.

put in the expression and the sample value and click the match button to see it in action.
try putting in something other than a number or a period and you will see that it does not match.

http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~matuszek/General/RegexTester/regex-tester.html

example

sample
0
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
[\d.] is NOT "match a single digit". The regexp is not correct, it checks for at least one digit or dot at the end of the line. Matches are e.g.
   abc123
   abc1.2
   abc.
You probably want to check for digits only. That would be '^\d+$' then.
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Jeff DarlingDeveloper AnalystCommented:
If you want to enforce a length limit, here is one way to do that.

^\d{4}$

This will only match if there is exactly 4 digits and only digits.
0
 
bcruse32347Commented:
[\d\.]+$ mean?

regular expression (pattern match). Sometimes reffered to as Regexp

The "[  ]" house the pattern
The "\" tells the expression thatthe next input is a part of the pattern
The "d" is for a single digit
The "\" tells the expression thatthe next input is a part of the pattern
The "." is  a period in the expression
The "+" tells the expression the previous pattern can repeat any number of times
The "$" tells the expression it is the ens of the line
0
 
kmslogicCommented:
Yeah I missed the \. and thought it was just a period which matches any character. Qlemo is definitely right and his replacement pattern is much better if the usernames you are looking for are digits only.
0
 
Joseph MoodyBlogger and wearer of all hats.Author Commented:
Thank you all so much!
0

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