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Which domain to install Enterprise Root CA server in?

Hey guys. Our AD infrastructure never had a PKI within it. We are installing LYNC now and I need to setup an enterprise root CA server. But I am unsure of what domain to join it to.

We currently have a root domain with 3 child domains. Example:

root.corp
cd1.root.corp
cd2.root.corp
cd3.root.corp

Our Exchange servers are in one child domain, say cd2.root.corp and the LYNC server is going to be installed in another child domain cd1.root.corp.

Can I install our CA server in any child domain or does it have to be joined to the root domain, root.corp?

TIA
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zito2000
Asked:
zito2000
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2 Solutions
 
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
enterprise root ca should be in the root AD root.corp but can be on a member server and not the AD/DNS server
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DaveCommented:
Why do you need an Enterprise Root CA?. In general its still considered best practice to have a standalone root CA thats kept off-line.

If you install it standalone on a member server from an account with enterprise admin rights it will set up the trusted root store on the local PCs.

I am currently re-building a CA hierarchy after the original was installed with the root on a DC and the issueing CA's on DHCP servers we want to retire and rename so I caution you to be carefull how you design it.

At the very least look at giving the CRLs server agnostic names e.g. "pki.mydomain.com/crl"

The Microsoft "best Practice" guide has some scripts that help..

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc772670(v=ws.10).aspx
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
From the best practices guide:
Certificate Services offers two types of CAs that have different feature sets: enterprise CAs and stand-alone CAs. A Windows Server 2003 PKI may consist of both types of CAs, which is often recommended for the enterprise environment. A comparison of strengths of the stand-alone CA and the enterprise CA may help you decide what CA type is required for which role.
A stand-alone CA should be used if:
•      It is an offline root or offline intermediate CA.
•      Support of templates that you can customize is not required.
•      A strong security and approval model is required.
•      Fewer certificates are enrolled and the manual work that you must do to issue certificates is acceptable.
•      Clients are heterogeneous and cannot benefit from Active Directory.
•      It is combined with a third party Registration Authority solution in a multi-forest or heterogeneous environment
•      It issues certificates to routers through the SCEP protocol

An enterprise CA should be used if:
•      A large number of certificates should be enrolled and approved automatically.
•      Availability and redundancy is mandatory.
•      Clients need the benefits of Active Directory integration.
•      Features such as autoenrollment or modifiable V2 templates are required.
•      Key archival and recovery is required to escrow encryption keys

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=20677
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zito2000Author Commented:
Thanks for the help guys. According to the Microsoft consultant that is configuring the LYNC server on his end (in our Germany office; I'm in the US) he requested the CA be an enterprise CA.

But now we have the issue of creating custom templates and need to upgrade to an enterprise version of Windows Server. But that's another issue =D

Thanks for the quick replies.
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