Solved

Access Visual basic Statement in statement How To

Posted on 2013-01-29
4
377 Views
Last Modified: 2013-01-29
Microsoft Access Visual Basic 2007

I have this:

S2 = "[" & Me.Select1 & "]"
 
Forms!main.Form!Data.S2.ColumnHidden = False


Notice, i'm trying to use the S2 in the second statement.

But this won't work, can someone please provide a suggestion about how to go about this?
0
Comment
Question by:Ursino
  • 2
4 Comments
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Flyster
ID: 38832665
Did you try it without the &'s?

S2 = "[Me.Select1]"

Flyster
0
 
LVL 47

Accepted Solution

by:
Dale Fye (Access MVP) earned 500 total points
ID: 38832672
Try something like:

Forms!Main!subformControlName.Form.Controls(me.Select1).ColumnHidden = False

I assume you are trying to unhide a column in a datasheet that is being used as a subform on you main form.  Where is this code firing from?  Is it a control on the main form?  If so, you should be able to use something like:

me.subformControlName.Form.Controls(me.Select1).ColumnHidden = false

Note:  subformControlName refers to the NAME of the subform CONTROL, not the name of the form that is the SourceObject of the subform.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Ursino
ID: 38832753
This worked like a charm, all assumptions made were correct.
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 38832799
glad I could help.
0

Featured Post

Comprehensive Backup Solutions for Microsoft

Acronis protects the complete Microsoft technology stack: Windows Server, Windows PC, laptop and Surface data; Microsoft business applications; Microsoft Hyper-V; Azure VMs; Microsoft Windows Server 2016; Microsoft Exchange 2016 and SQL Server 2016.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Most if not all databases provide tools to filter data; even simple mail-merge programs might offer basic filtering capabilities. This is so important that, although Access has many built-in features to help the user in this task, developers often n…
When you are entering numbers in a speadsheet, and don't remember what 6×7 is, you just type “=6*7" instead. It works in every cell! This is not so in Access. To enter the elusive 42 in a text box, you have to find a calculator, and then copy the re…
Using Microsoft Access, learn some simple rules for how to construct tables in a relational database. Split up all multi-value fields into single values: Split up fields that belong to other things into separate tables: Make sure that all record…
In Microsoft Access, learn how to use Dlookup and other domain aggregate functions and one method of specifying a string value within a string. Specify the first argument, which is the expression to be returned: Specify the second argument, which …

861 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

30 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now