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Access query to remove leading zeros

Posted on 2013-01-29
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Last Modified: 2013-01-29
I have a search button where user type in and find the detailed in the form but what user does is when there are leading zeros like 0005,user type in 5 only and for 00222,user type in 222 but my query works only when user type in whole number like 00222 and 005.Please help as to make this query something like right function in sql.Thanks in advance

Here's my query-
SELECT [ABC].NNN
   ,[ABC].AAA
  FROM [ABC]
  WHERE ((([ABC].NNN) = [Enter AB]
         OR ([ABC].AAA) = [Enter AB]))
0
Comment
Question by:Josh2442
2 Comments
 
LVL 84
ID: 38833040
I would assume your values are NOT on stored with a Numeric Datatype (you can't store number with leading 0's), so you can just use a LIKE comparator:

SELECT * ABC WHERE [NNN] LIKE '*" & Me.YourSearchValue & "*'"
0
 
LVL 47

Accepted Solution

by:
Dale Fye (Access MVP) earned 400 total points
ID: 38833042
SELECT [ABC].NNN ,[ABC].AAA
FROM [ABC]
WHERE [ABC].NNN Like "*" & [Enter AB] & "*"
OR [ABC].AAA Like "*" & [Enter AB] & "*"

Will get all those records where the characters entered in the input box are located anywhere within [AAA] or [BBB]
0

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