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MySQL CLI doesn't require a password

I have a server where I can access MySQL via the command line interface by SSH-ing into the server as root, and then just typing "mysql". I get dropped to a MySQL command line interface.

In the mysql.user table, I do see the 'root'@'localhost' user but it has a password (the contents of the "password" field is filled with a hash).

I don't understand how I can login to the MySQL CLI without having to enter a password.

On my other server, we have to enter a password for root - and we happen to have set the root password in MySQL to the same password as is being used in SSH. I'd prefer it to work that way.

Can anybody point me at where this is configured?

Thanks,
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Frosty555
Asked:
Frosty555
1 Solution
 
Mark GilbertSenior Performance EngineerCommented:
you will find that the root user has been granted * privileges with no password if you look at the permissions tab within phpmyadmin. This is a common setup for a lot of virtual hosts, so that the user that's able to log into the console automatically has access to edit every other setting and therefore gets root access to the database. The following page explains this, as well as how to button down your security:

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/default-privileges.html
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
The default installation for MySQL does Not set a password for 'root' as mentioned in that article.
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arnoldCommented:
There are multiple root entries and you empty password root attempt is accepted based on one of those
select * from mysql.user where user='root' and password='';
You could use
update mysql.user set password=Password('your password') where user='root';
flush privileges;

If you want to set the same password for all entries for root since root%127.0.0.1 and root%localhost and root%ipaddress are three separate entities.
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johanntagleCommented:
Also take a look if you have a .my.cnf file in your root home directory.  It might have an entry like this:

[client]
password = something

Open in new window


Basically if you typed in just "mysql" it will check if you have an entry in the .my.cnf for user and/or password.  If you have an entry for user, it will use that as the user, otherwise it will use the your system account, which in this case, is root.  If you have an entry for password then it will use that too.  Note that you can put password only or user only in .my.cnf, though I recommend highly against it.  I think putting user credentials in the .my.cnf should only be acceptable on a personal machine which only you can access, and even that has security risks too.
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