• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1833
  • Last Modified:

Maximizer SQL Password Reset

I have lost the password for the Master account in Maximizer.  I have found this online

http://cinchnetworks.blogspot.ca/2011/08/recovering-from-lost-master-password.html

but I am stuck at this step:

WHERE Record_Id IN
(SELECT Record_Id FROM dbo.ADMN_Users
WHERE User_Id='MASTER')

I am very savy with computers but I am not with SQL sadly.  Can anyone help me go through with this?
0
Lounger-Master
Asked:
Lounger-Master
  • 3
  • 3
1 Solution
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
The line immediately above those three lines (UPDATE dbo.ADMN_Users1 SET [Password]='' ) should have also have been run.  (I.e. the first line you quoted above is actually line 2 of the command.

The bad news is, if you've already run the first line by itself, you've likely cleared the password for all the admin users, i.e. set them all blank.
0
 
Lounger-MasterAuthor Commented:
I did run the line s in this order:

1. ALTER LOGIN MASTER WITH PASSWORD='CONTROL'
2. USE SalesDatabase
3. UPDATE dbo.ADMN_Users1 SET [Password]=''  
4. WHERE Record_Id IN (This one doesnt work as I think I need to select something for IN?)

Does line 3 clear the password?   Should I have put a password in where it says Password in line 3?
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
> Does line 3 clear the password?

Very likely it does clear the password, and because you ran the UPDATE without a WHERE clause, set all the passwords to blank.

You can confirm with the command:
"select a.*,u.* from dbo.ADMN_Users1 a JOIN dbo.ADMN_Users u ON a.Record_Id = u.Record_Id"
which I believe will output all your user records.  Unfortunately, I think you will find all the passwords now blank.

> Should I have put a password in where it says Password in line 3?
Probably not.  Based on that blog, the program itself will now notice that the password is different, and will prompt you for a new password.  I'd allow it to do that.  (Trying to set the password to something else wouldn't really accomplish anything unless you know what encryption routine the passwords are scrambled with.)

However, once you get in as MASTER, you'll likely need to come up with a plan for the other users, possibly resetting all the user passwords.

In other words, try launching Maximizer now, and see if the rest of the blog is accurate about allowing you to log in as MASTER.
0
VIDEO: THE CONCERTO CLOUD FOR HEALTHCARE

Modern healthcare requires a modern cloud. View this brief video to understand how the Concerto Cloud for Healthcare can help your organization.

 
Lounger-MasterAuthor Commented:
So far I am simply not sure what to do in step 4.  I have not gone any further in the article and the SQL Management Studio is open and waitng for me to  complete step 4.  Before I go further on this step below, what  does this (SELECT Record_Id FROM dbo.ADMN_Users
WHERE User_Id='MASTER')  mean for the step  WHERE Record_Id IN ?  The variable IN ?
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
Execute this:
SELECT Record_Id FROM dbo.ADMN_Users WHERE User_Id='MASTER'

It will return a single Record_ID.
That Record_ID would have matched the Record_ID in the dbo.ADMN_Users1 table which actually has the password records.  

IN is a matching condition.  In this case, the query
"WHERE Record_Id IN " is a condition of the previous line which will limit the previous line to only match records which have a Record_Id which is contained in the list of values returned in the next query.  Think of it as an equal sign, except it can match a single value against a set of values.

In that blog, these lines are all one command:
UPDATE dbo.ADMN_Users1 SET [Password]=''
WHERE Record_Id IN
(SELECT Record_Id FROM dbo.ADMN_Users
WHERE User_Id='MASTER')
They could have been written as:
"UPDATE dbo.ADMN_Users1 SET [Password]='' WHERE Record_Id IN (SELECT Record_Id FROM dbo.ADMN_Users WHERE User_Id='MASTER');"
But SQL statements are frequently broken up for readability, and the extra end-of-line characters are usually ignored.

What you are treating as step 4 is a partial command.  If you've already executed what you consider step 3, you have already completed everything that the original author intended for you to do, AND you've reset all the other passwords as well.
0
 
Lounger-MasterAuthor Commented:
Thank You so much!  That did the trick!
0

Featured Post

Important Lessons on Recovering from Petya

In their most recent webinar, Skyport Systems explores ways to isolate and protect critical databases to keep the core of your company safe from harm.

  • 3
  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now