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Can you recommend a couple of model of WiFi access point?

Posted on 2013-02-04
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Last Modified: 2013-02-11
We have about 30 users in office and they all use wired cat6. We curecnlty have a Linksys WAP4400N wifi access point for mobiles and some laptops. We want to either add one more or replace the currecnt one. Can you recommend a couple of models?
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Question by:Castlewood
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by:Alexios
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Hello
Are you going to use roaming between the APs?
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by:Darr247
Darr247 earned 500 total points
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by:Castlewood
ID: 38854891
No we won't use roaming between APs.
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by:Darr247
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What do you have for the rest of your network infrastructure?
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by:Castlewood
ID: 38859750
We just have two gb switches and the currecnt wifi AP. That's it.

Can someone help me understand what the dual bands can benefit?
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by:Rick_O_Shay
ID: 38860905
Netgear WNDR3700 and WNDR4500.

Dual bands means there are two radios in the AP which allows more clients to have easy access because some can only work in the the 2.4 GHZ band and some in the 5 GHZ band.
Also it allows spreading out the load as clients can be on distributed to either one band or the other.
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Darr247 earned 500 total points
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Some manufacturers, such as Cisco, Apple and Intel, don't support 40MHz-wide channels in the 2.4GHz band, because those use 2/3rds of the available bandwidth in that band. The 5GHz band typically has room for 6 double-wide channels (in FCC and ETSI jurisdictions, anyway).

Double the bandwidth means double the throughput. Without wide channels, 802.11n generally tops out at 130Mbps; with wide-channels you should be able to get 300Mbps when close to the AP (see MCS Index #15 at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009#Data_rates ). Note that because of encoding and frame overhead, real-world throughput works out to only about half the reported connection rate. That's true of all WiFi.

Most new laptops come with dual-band 802.11n WiFi adapters, so they can make use of the 5GHz band when the 2.4GHz band is congested with legacy devices.
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