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Windows Server 2003 - File Server System

We have a Windows Server 2003 and it's hosting users' folders.  We are running out of disk space all of a sudden, and we've just found out that there's a "System Volume Information" directory that takes up 120GB of the disk space, with all the files in this structure "{b8eb2f0a-44e5-11e2-8f4e-0024e852fa77}{3808876b-c176-4e48-b7ae-04046e6cc752}"... there are close to 200 files similar to this.  Should I or can I delete these file?  Please advise.  Thanks.

p.s. I think these files are for restoring purposes, but we already have a backup solution in place that does all the backup/restore users' files or folders.
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swgit
Asked:
swgit
3 Solutions
 
EMJSRCommented:
You can limit the space used for the System Restore options. Have a look in the configuration for the System Restore and move the slider for the respective drive to a lower setting.

Additionaly go to the HDD Properties (from Windows Explorer) and check the "Shadow Copies" tab. You may have Volume Shadow Copies enabled which essentially will store several previous versions of files. If you turn that down a little (I wouldn't turn it off), so it saves fewer copies, you should be able to free up some space.
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swgitIT ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
We do not use Shadow Copies.  I just want to make sure that deleting the extra old {xxx##xxx-xxx#####x#-xxx###xxx} files are okay.  Thanks.
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EMJSRCommented:
I don't see why not. But I would not delete them manually. I would run the Disk Cleanup wizard (cleanmgr.exe) and do it that way. Just to make sure Windows removes those files properly.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I don't know why you wouldn't want to use shadow copies - it's an immensely useful feature and has saved people hours of problems and hassles of going to take.  

You do not want to be manually deleting anything in the System Volume Information folder.  If you want to disable shadow copy, disable it.  If you want to keep it (I recommend you do) you can move it to another drive.  The move isn't really a move though - it's more a disable/re-enable and place on another drive letter (you can't actually "move" in the strictest sense - when you disable and re-enable, you end up destroying all previous shadow copies.
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ZenVenkyArchitectCommented:
You can delete those files from System Volume Information folder. Make sure that you delete old dated folders. Normally whenever you install any application a backup will be created of that app in System Volume Information. So you can delete all those folders there will be NO ISSUE in the server. I suggest you to use Disk Cleanup by doing right click on C drive properties and disk cleanup.
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swgitIT ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
I'm still puzzled on how that "System Volume Information" folders on these "data" drives are getting too huge; and I still don't know what the first part and second part of this string "{b8eb2f0a-44e5-11e2-8f4e-0024e852fa77}{3808876b-c176-4e48-b7ae-04046e6cc752}" represents.  

Anyways, I'll do more research and if I find anything that could explain this, I'll update.  For now, let's close this as nothing is related to "shadow copies", "indexing", or "disk cleanup".
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EMJSRCommented:
Well, the System Volume Information contains restore points among other things. The long numbers are GUIDs with which Windows can identify properties of the data. That just as a basic explanation.
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swgitIT ProfessionalAuthor Commented:
There's no restore points configured either.  The only things hosted on these drives are users' folders, etc.  and I can't seem to match the GUID's to any of the users.
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