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Windows Server 2003 - File Server System

Posted on 2013-02-04
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Last Modified: 2013-02-05
We have a Windows Server 2003 and it's hosting users' folders.  We are running out of disk space all of a sudden, and we've just found out that there's a "System Volume Information" directory that takes up 120GB of the disk space, with all the files in this structure "{b8eb2f0a-44e5-11e2-8f4e-0024e852fa77}{3808876b-c176-4e48-b7ae-04046e6cc752}"... there are close to 200 files similar to this.  Should I or can I delete these file?  Please advise.  Thanks.

p.s. I think these files are for restoring purposes, but we already have a backup solution in place that does all the backup/restore users' files or folders.
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Question by:swgit
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by:EMJSR
ID: 38852404
You can limit the space used for the System Restore options. Have a look in the configuration for the System Restore and move the slider for the respective drive to a lower setting.

Additionaly go to the HDD Properties (from Windows Explorer) and check the "Shadow Copies" tab. You may have Volume Shadow Copies enabled which essentially will store several previous versions of files. If you turn that down a little (I wouldn't turn it off), so it saves fewer copies, you should be able to free up some space.
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by:swgit
ID: 38852932
We do not use Shadow Copies.  I just want to make sure that deleting the extra old {xxx##xxx-xxx#####x#-xxx###xxx} files are okay.  Thanks.
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by:EMJSR
EMJSR earned 167 total points
ID: 38852955
I don't see why not. But I would not delete them manually. I would run the Disk Cleanup wizard (cleanmgr.exe) and do it that way. Just to make sure Windows removes those files properly.
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Lee W, MVP earned 167 total points
ID: 38853370
I don't know why you wouldn't want to use shadow copies - it's an immensely useful feature and has saved people hours of problems and hassles of going to take.  

You do not want to be manually deleting anything in the System Volume Information folder.  If you want to disable shadow copy, disable it.  If you want to keep it (I recommend you do) you can move it to another drive.  The move isn't really a move though - it's more a disable/re-enable and place on another drive letter (you can't actually "move" in the strictest sense - when you disable and re-enable, you end up destroying all previous shadow copies.
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by:Zenvenky
Zenvenky earned 166 total points
ID: 38853814
You can delete those files from System Volume Information folder. Make sure that you delete old dated folders. Normally whenever you install any application a backup will be created of that app in System Volume Information. So you can delete all those folders there will be NO ISSUE in the server. I suggest you to use Disk Cleanup by doing right click on C drive properties and disk cleanup.
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Author Closing Comment

by:swgit
ID: 38858002
I'm still puzzled on how that "System Volume Information" folders on these "data" drives are getting too huge; and I still don't know what the first part and second part of this string "{b8eb2f0a-44e5-11e2-8f4e-0024e852fa77}{3808876b-c176-4e48-b7ae-04046e6cc752}" represents.  

Anyways, I'll do more research and if I find anything that could explain this, I'll update.  For now, let's close this as nothing is related to "shadow copies", "indexing", or "disk cleanup".
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by:EMJSR
ID: 38858035
Well, the System Volume Information contains restore points among other things. The long numbers are GUIDs with which Windows can identify properties of the data. That just as a basic explanation.
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by:swgit
ID: 38858046
There's no restore points configured either.  The only things hosted on these drives are users' folders, etc.  and I can't seem to match the GUID's to any of the users.
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