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Change the default location and size of maximized windows

Posted on 2013-02-04
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Hello,

In MS Windows 7, is there a way to change the default location and size of windows in the maximized position?

For example, maximizing a window causes the bottom border to be positioned just above the taskbar. However, in the properties setting for the taskbar, I noticed an option to auto-hide the taskbar. When that option is selected, the taskbar slides down below the screen (when not in use). As would be expected, maximizing a window in this scenario causes its bottom border to be positioned at the bottom of the screen effectively giving the window a larger area than was the case previously.

I've got a large number of small Graphic User Interface (GUI) controls which I want located along the bottom of the screen. The space vacated by a hidden taskbar is perfect for that purpose — and having the taskbar intermittently slide up over the GUI's is not a problem. However, to make the GUI's useful, I need a way to prevent maximized windows from obscuring them. I realize I could set the GUIs to be "always on top" but that of course would obscure the bottom of every maximized window.

The best solution I can think of would be to redefine the lower border of maximized windows. For instance, if when the taskbar is set to auto-hide, the lower border was maintained in the same position as it is when the taskbar is not set to auto-hide, that would do the trick.

Is that doable and if so, how is it done?

Thanks
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Question by:Steve_Brady
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4 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Darr247
ID: 38853058
UNmaximize the program windows and pull the borders where you want.Win7 - Toolbar Up (click for larger)
Then when the toolbar hides, it leaves the desktop visible.Win7 - Toolbar Hidden (click for larger)
If I recall correctly, holding down a Ctrl key when closing the program with the 'red x' forces saving the new window size and position.
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Author Comment

by:Steve_Brady
ID: 38874270
Thanks for the response.

If I understand your comments correctly, you are describing how to set a particular window to a new un-maximized location. I'm not sure what the Ctrl+"Red X" is meant to do but in my system (Windows 7), an application when relaunched, assumes the same position it occupied when last closed — regardless of whether the Ctrl key is pressed during closing.

In any event, my question does not relate at all to the location of windows when un-maximized. Instead, I am interested in finding a way to change the position of a window when it is maximized:

From my initial question:
In MS Windows 7, is there a way to change the default location and size of windows in the maximized position?
In other words, when I click to maximize, I want the window to not fill the entire screen but only some defined portion of it.

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Darr247 earned 2000 total points
ID: 38874742
By definition, "maximized" means to fill the entire screen.  
You cannot change the 'maximized' size to other than the full screen size in Windows.

> I'm not sure what the Ctrl+"Red X" is meant to do

As I said, it 'forces' Windows to forget the old program window 'Restore' size/position and remember the new one instead.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Steve_Brady
ID: 38940193
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