Advanced TCP/IP settings (DNS related)

Hi

I was looking at the Advanced TCP/IP settings for a Windows 2008 Server and had some questions.

We have a multi-forest/multi-domain environment. The application server is based in a forest (one domain) named Production.mydomain.com

We also have other forests named UAT.uatdomain.com and Dev.devdomain.com

The application and its clients are all based in Production.mydomain.com, however test machines from the other domains may occasionally make connections to the server.

Under DNS, there is "Append Primary and connection specific DNS suffixes". What effect does entering domains in here have? I was going to add only production.mydomain.com and also have "DNS Suffix for this connection:" set to the same. Will this have an effect on clients connecting from other forests?

I can surely add them, but I just wanted to be sure of the logic behind this.

Thanks for any assistance
cpancamoAsked:
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Mike KlineConnect With a Mentor Commented:
It means when your clients look for host names and use the various suffixes.

You look for the machine test

It will use test.domain.com  

test.suffix2.com
test.suffix3.com
etc....

It should not affect clients from other forests.

Thanks

Mike
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cpancamoAuthor Commented:
Thanks Mike.

So if the server has no need to initiate a connection to a device in another forest, there is no need to have the other forests listed?

How about web browsing? We may need to connect to https://download1.UAT.uatdomain.com for instance to download a package. Since we are specifying the full FQDN in the HTTP string, this shouldn't make a difference, right?

In fact, that setting only affects connections where the FQDN is not included?
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Nirmal SharmaSolution ArchitectCommented:
Hey Mike - how have you been? Please drop me a line at my email address [ nirmal_sharma @ mvps.org ]

HTTP traffic is again send to DNS Servers you have configured locally PLUS the logic as stated by Mike above.

>>>In fact, that setting only affects connections where the FQDN is not included?
True. DNS Resolver follows a logic in which it checks to see if name supplied for resolution is a flat name or FQDN.

Sys
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