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New PC on Win SBS 2003 domain - being asked for Domain Admin credentials when making changes.

Hi guys,

I've added two Windows 7 laptops to a Windows SBS 2003 Domain but keep getting pop-up windows when installing new programs/ making changes asking for the Domain Administrator credentials. I know them, so I can enter them and proceed, but I can't seem to figure out how to give the PC/ user sufficient privileges to avoid these messages. I know I've done this before, but seem to be having trouble working out what to do this time. I have double-clicked on their user profile in SERVER MANAGEMENT, clicked on the MEMBERS OF tab and have added them to Power Users, etc, groups but there is no change, even after a restart. Please help!
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Servant-Leggie
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Servant-Leggie
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1 Solution
 
tjc123IT DirectorCommented:
You need to go into the User Accounts area of the Windows 7 machines and add the local user account as an Admin or turn off UAC.
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NicolusCommented:
Read up a little about User Roles...  The only per se advantage of Power User is the fact that the user can create shares.

You need to either add these users to the local admin group or use GPO to allow these users to make the changes you want to allow.

If you need more help with adding users to a local admin group, ask
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Servant-LeggieAuthor Commented:
Thanks, tjc123, I'll get a chance to do this in the next 24hrs or so and will let you know how it goes.

Nicolus, will do some reading! When you say "...adding users to a local admin group...", I have added the users as local admins (following the procedure I mentioned initially, I added them as part of the Administrator Group - as I understand it, this is what you're referring to?!
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NicolusCommented:
On the local machine, log in as an Admin enable user, Right Click on Computer > Manage> Local Users & Groups> Group> and add Domain User to the Administrators group.

This basically mimics a standalone admin user on a machine that happens to be on a domain
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
On a domain the users are standard users by default, Standard users do not have the privileges to make system changes  i.e. add/remove programs.  Most domains have the PC's setup by the administrators and the users are simply users.  This keeps most machines available without needing administrators to reload the image of the pc, or worry about unwanted software on the domain network.

You can use SCCM to approve software and have it available for install and it will be installed for the user.

Gone are the days when domain users can make system-wide changes to their PC.  If you want to reduce the system security you can disable UAC, or add the user to the local administrators group and let them re-enter their password to install software.. This is not the recommended procedure.
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Pramod UbheCommented:
add that user to local admin group and then run the program by right clicking it and select run as administrator.
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hecgomrecCommented:
What Nicolus said is correct.

Just make sure that your user or you are login into the computer with the domain-user account instead of the local account.

To avoid conflicts, you can eliminate the local account or if you want to leave both just make sure both accounts are in the administrators groups.

Good Luck
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Servant-LeggieAuthor Commented:
Thanks Nicolus, your answer was spot on (as you knew) and the problem is now resolved. Strangely, I haven't had to do these steps for other users who are running Windows 7 Pro towers on their Windows Server 2003 Domain- just removed their old XP towers, installed their new Win7 towers, added them to the domain (with a different PC name to the one being replaced) and continued with the usual data transfer/ email setup/ etc. I'm sure there's a good reason why, but as I'm (clearly) not yet an expert at handling servers/ domains/ permissions, I don't quite understand.
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hecgomrecCommented:
I know this was aswered but based on your last comment, Servant, if the new machines were prepared as separated machines, just follow the process described to you earlier to find out if the users is using a local account or a domain account.
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Servant-LeggieAuthor Commented:
Hi hecgomrec, will do, just thought it was strange that I didn't follow the prescribed procedure on previously installed machines, yet have had none of these issues on said machines.
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