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Can I install Access 2003 on Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit

Posted on 2013-02-06
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Last Modified: 2013-02-06
Hi all.

Can I install Access 2003 on Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit, will I incur any issues. I plan to work on an Access 2003 .adp file, the .ade file will then be used by Windows 7 Premium 64 bit computers that use the Access 2003 runtime to open the .ade file.

Thank you in advance.
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Question by:printmedia
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clarkscott earned 250 total points
ID: 38859756
I've installed it on my Win 7 PC.  I have 2003 and 2010 installed on my PC.
If you already have 2007 or 2010, you may have to uninstall first... install 2003, then re-install the later version.

Scott C
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by:Helen_Feddema
Helen_Feddema earned 250 total points
ID: 38860083
It should be OK, if it is the only Office (Access) version, or if it is installed in a VM.  There are some issues with 32-bit Office/Windows vs. 64-bit Office/Windows, however.  Some code works in a 32-bit environment but not in a 64-bit environment.  I recently had to use a laptop with 64-bit Windows 7 and 64-bit 2010 Office to do some development, because some of the code that worked fine in 32-bit Office running on 32-bit Windows 7 didn't work in the 64-bit environment.
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by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 38860147
Helen,

Let me make sure this is clear to the OP, and me.

"because some of the code that worked fine in 32-bit Office running on 32-bit Windows 7 didn't work in the 64-bit environment."

I don't think it is the "environment" (read operating system) that is causing the problem, it is the 64 bit Microsoft Office.  Is that correct?

At least that is the case with me.  I've got 32 bit Office running in Win 7 (64-bit) that is not encountering any problems, but my 2003 and 2007 apps running in Win 7 (64-bit) with Offices (64-bit) do encounter significant problems with API calls as well as ActiveX controls.
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by:Helen_Feddema
ID: 38860169
Yes, I believe it is the difference between 64-bit and 32-bit Office that causes the problems.  In this case I was working with a Word global template that got data from an Access database.
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by:printmedia
ID: 38860223
Is there an Office 2003 32-bit and Office 2003 64-bit? If so, does that mean I have to use the Office 2003 64-bit to create the .ade file for my Windows 7 computers and then use the Office 2003 32-bit to create the .ade file for my WindowsXP computers?
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LVL 57
ID: 38860251
<<Is there an Office 2003 32-bit and Office 2003 64-bit?>>

 No.  Up until Office 2010, Office only came in 32 bit.   And yes, something developed in a 32 bit version of Office will have issues under a 64 bit version of Office, but not in a 32 bit version of Office running under a 64 bit version of windows, except....

 A2000/2003 are incompatible with Windows 8.   So your fine with them all the way through Win 7 with a 32 bit version of Office installed all the way to Office 2010.

 Yeah, a little confusing<g>

Jim.
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LVL 57
ID: 38860269
<<And yes, something developed in a 32 bit version of Office will have issues under a 64 bit version of Office>>

 I should clairify that a bit; it depends on the app.  If you don't make API calls, use 3rd party controls, DLL's or Type libs, then even a 32 bit Access app would run OK.  It's when you start doing the other stuff that you run into problems.

When your running under 64 bit Office, all calls etc must be in 64 bit.  So API declarations need to be changed, you need 3 party controls that are 64 bit, type libs and DLLs need to be 64 bit, etc.

 Put plain Jane Access apps would run OK.  You'd just need to compile the code again.

Jim.
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Author Comment

by:printmedia
ID: 38860292
Got it thanks.

Even though some computers are Windows 7 and some are WindowsXP, all the machines have the Access 2003 runtime and use that open the .ade file.

The Windows7 computers have the Access 2003 installed in the "Program Files (x86)" folder while the XP have it in the normal "Program Files" folder.
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LVL 57
ID: 38860358
<<The Windows7 computers have the Access 2003 installed in the "Program Files (x86)" folder while the XP have it in the normal "Program Files" folder. >>

 Yeah, you have to watch that.  Also under Win 7, those are proetect folders from writes with a virtual re-direct.

 Your options are:

1. Always install your app in it's own folder off the root

2. Alter the security on the installed folder. give everyone (or authenticated users) full permissions and take ownership of the folder and files.  The last is critical.  If you don't, Win 7 will continue to protect the folder despite the security.

3. Turn off UAC under Windows 7 and reset the folder security.

Jim.
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