How Tokens effect Kerberos mechanism

Hello,
I am planning to implement Hadoop Security using Kerberos. It says that using Tokens will ensure KDC is not a bottleneck. I have heard about principle and keytabs. Where does Keberos Tokens come into the picture, Or are kerberos tickets called kerberos tokens...??

Thanks,
sriveena2010Asked:
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DipakCommented:
The words token and ticket depend greatly on the type of system you're dealing with; and in what context you are talking. On Windows NT derivatives, the concept of a token is an identity. When a user or service logs in to a system, the system validates their integrity once, and mints a token, which is handed to that user/service and serves as their identity. The system then doesn't need to validate identity every time a program opens a file, for example. This basically ensures a clean separation between authentication (proving a user/service is who they say they are) and authorization (determining whether a user/service can access some resource).

On the other hand, (again for NT derivatives) the word ticket usually refers to Kerberos tickets. These are used for two machines on a domain to be able to prove each others' identity. After proving one's identity to the domain controller (with traditional means such as password or smart card), the domain controller mints a ticket which can be passed to remote machines to verify identity.

If one is dealing with a remote machine, then it is likely both tickets and tokens are involved. For instance, if machine A opens a file share on machine B, then machine A validates the user using it with the domain controller, thus getting a Kerberos ticket. It then uses the Kerberos ticket to verify its identity with machine B. Machine B then creates a session for machine A, minting a token, to serve as that session identity for local authorization queries on machine B.
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