Can I play Apple TV across routed subnets?

I have a large environment that has (3) routed subnets for LAN clients and (1) subnet dedicated for wireless clients (laptop, i-device, android, etc...).

We have installed an Apple-TV on the wireless network so that we can send media to it with AirPlay on MACs / iPads / iPhones.  This has been working great!

The first issue with this came up when a wired network client wanted to share data with the AppleTV via AirParrot.  The Apple TV device is not able to be discovered unless we use a laptop that is also on the WiFi network, the same laptop connected to the LAN with the WiFi card off cannot find the AppleTV device.

The LAN consists of an HP Procurve Layer 3 switch with (4) routable VLANs created.  There is no restriction between subnets.

I've tried selectively rebroadcasting UDP 5353 (multicast DNS) from the wireless segment to the LAN segment, and vice-versa (both at the same time and opposite times) without success...no matter what I do, I cannot see the AppleTV unless the client that needs to see it is on the WiFi network with it.

If the AppleTV is connected to both WiFi and Wired, is it able to use BOTH networks?  Any help is appreciated...our requirements are to get the AppleTV accessible by both wired and wireless clients to send media to it, either via AirPlay or AirParrot.

Thanks!
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jkeegan123Asked:
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Justin Pierce, CEH, CNDAConnect With a Mentor NASA Cybersecurity EngineerCommented:
Hi jkeegan123,

    Your best bet is to have 2 AppleTVs because as soon as you plug in the CAT 5 the AppleTV will automatically shutoff the wifi, since it prioritizes a wired ethernet connection.

I would set things up this way:

AppleTV 1: Wifi connected/ hooked up through HDMI port 1 on HD TV  

AppleTV 2: Ethernet connected/ hooked up through HDMI port 2 on HD TV. (Good for AirParrot)

 In short, everybody who wants to stream wirelessly from a laptop will be picked up on AppleTV 1 and all others will have to stream through Ethernet via AirParrot on AppleTV 2.

Side note: Make sure that your client, when hooked up via CAT 5, isn't holding other network settings and that they are indeed on the same IP scheme as your LAN.

If you're connected via Ethernet and are trying to stream from AirParrot and are having troubles, try turning off AirParrot and your firewall (Restart if you're on a PC) and then open AirParrot again.

Hope this helps.
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jkeegan123Author Commented:
What about allowing apple TV to cross subnets?  Is that just not possible with Apple TV?
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Justin Pierce, CEH, CNDANASA Cybersecurity EngineerCommented:
Hi jkeegan123,

The subnets shouldn't matter as long as they are on the same VLAN because they'll both be in the same broadcast domain. The issue still remains though, with AppleTV automatically switching from wifi to ethernet if a CAT 5 is plugged in. Sorry for the bad news.

Hope this helps.
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jkeegan123Author Commented:
Well I only have it on WIFI, I was saying that I could plug it into both if that would work, but I suspected it wouldn't.

Broadcasts do no cross subnet domains as well as VLAN's so ... even if they were on the same VLAN (which they're not) being on a separate subnet would still not allow their communication from what I've researched.  Apparently this is a multicast issue?
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Justin Pierce, CEH, CNDANASA Cybersecurity EngineerCommented:
Hi jkeegan123,

 Yeah, sorry about the bad news with the ethernet and wifi on the AppleTV. However, 2 PCs on different subnets can ping if they are on the same VLAN because they are in the same Layer 2 broadcast domain. Here is a Cisco forum that touches on the subject: https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/thread/28157

Post 9,11,& 12 are the ones to look at.

I know your devices on a different VLAN, but the information is still interesting. Cheers!
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jkeegan123Author Commented:
2 PC's in same VLAN but different subnets can NOT communicate via TCP/IP without a router, in the examples they are routing to interfaces, so they might be inclined to say that they are not routing because they're giving an interface destination and not an IP GATEWAY destination, but what they might not realize is that those interfaces HAVE IP's and that's the IP that it's setting as the next hop.  The last post in the forum is correct, it is definitely not able to be done without a router.
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Justin Pierce, CEH, CNDANASA Cybersecurity EngineerCommented:
Sorry for this format, lol, but I'm out and about for groceries. You're right about the routers but I imagined your network, being large, had at least 2 of them. No problem though. Cheers.
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jkeegan123Author Commented:
This is not the ideal solution, but it is the easiest to implement so that something does not need to get installed every time the source machine changes networks.  Thanks!
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