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Debian tools or ways to measure LAN speeds

Posted on 2013-05-14
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Last Modified: 2013-05-17
Anyone here know any good Debian tools or ways to measure LAN speeds on for instance a Samba share from one PC to another on the same LAN?
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Question by:itnifl
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Mazdajai earned 500 total points
ID: 39166851
You can use iperf to measure network throughput, it is available for windows and linux.
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by:woolmilkporc
woolmilkporc earned 320 total points
ID: 39167254
If you have an FTP server running on one of the machines and an FTP client on the other one (probably you do) then this command will show the network transfer rate, without reading or writing from/to disk:

put "| dd if=/dev/zero bs=1m count=1000" /dev/null

The example above will transfer 1 GB of binary zeroes and measure/display the transfer speed.

I once made a script around the above command:

#!/bin/bash
# --- Variables --- #
host=${1:-localhost}
mb=${2:-1000}
user=userid
pass=password

# --- Doit --- #
ftp -n $host <<EOF 2>/dev/null | awk -F"[()]" '/bytes/ {printf "FTP transfer speed \('$mb' MB\) to '$host': %g MB/s\n", $2/1024}'
quote user $user
quote pass $pass
verbose
put "| dd if=/dev/zero bs=1m count=$mb" /dev/null
bye
quit
EOF

Open in new window


Change userid and password to your values and specify the target host and the amount of megabytes to transfer on the commandline, like

myscript myhost 1000

(assuming you called the script myscript).

wmp
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by:GhostInTheMacheen
GhostInTheMacheen earned 180 total points
ID: 39168100
Depending on how granular a view you want to have the are a number of tools available.

I usually use netstat (on Debian try "sudo netstat -antp") to get a per-port or per process listing and then use either iptraf or iftop to view the realtime network I/O on specific connections.

iftop is probably a little easier to jump into, but iptraf has a more configurable interface.

There's also a great application called nethogs that will give you a very simple (top like) per-process network I/O view with process name.

All three are available in the Debian apt repositories.
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