Solved

Zeros not displaying in report

Posted on 2013-05-14
7
251 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-20
I have the following in the control source of a report field where TotalNumber is a long integer field in the underlying query/table.
This works great to display either a number or N/A if the field is null but when the number is actually a zero, which I want to display, there is just a blank space.
Any suggestions?

=IIf(IsNull([TotalNumber]),"N/A",[TotalNumber])
0
Comment
Question by:esbyrt
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
7 Comments
 
LVL 25

Expert Comment

by:chaau
ID: 39167203
What format have you selected for the filed?
What version of Access you are using?

BTW, I have created a report in Access 2010 and it is displaying OK.

Computed filedSample ReportFormat of the field
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:clarkscott
ID: 39168159
Is this field the result of a left or right join?  If so, a null is not the default for a nonexistant value if the related source has no record.

Scott C
0
 

Author Comment

by:esbyrt
ID: 39170317
The field is formatted with #,### with 0 decimal places.  It is not a currency field, just a number field that needs the comma since the number can be into the millions and hard to read without that.  I am using Access 2010.  The field in the table has no format specified, just long integer.

clarkscott, the field is not joined directly but the table it's in is part of a right join.  But if I understand you correctly, you are saying the null wouldn't work.  The N/A displays properly if the field is empty, it's just a 0 value that won't display.

Thanks for having a look.  Any other suggestions?
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 25

Accepted Solution

by:
chaau earned 500 total points
ID: 39170343
As I suggested, it is the format. Change it to "#,##0" and it will work. Read about Format here to better understand the meaning of #

(in fact, you could achieve everything with the format without Iif, using the conditional formatting). Read the article at the above hyperlink, it is very informative
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:clarkscott
ID: 39174662
In the join query, instead of simply including the value (that might not exist, add an alias and IIf condition:

MyNewValue: iif(isnull([MyValue], 0, [MyValue])

This will ensure that there is at least a zero in the column.

Scott C
0
 
LVL 20

Expert Comment

by:clarkscott
ID: 39174668
correction:   (missed a ")"   )
MyNewValue: iif(isnull([MyValue]), 0, [MyValue])

Scott C
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:esbyrt
ID: 39182834
#,##0 did the trick.  Thanks Chaau.  (Sorry for the slow response, long weekend away from home and computer).
0

Featured Post

Ransomware: The New Cyber Threat & How to Stop It

This infographic explains ransomware, type of malware that blocks access to your files or your systems and holds them hostage until a ransom is paid. It also examines the different types of ransomware and explains what you can do to thwart this sinister online threat.  

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Phishing attempts can come in all forms, shapes and sizes. No matter how familiar you think you are with them, always remember to take extra precaution when opening an email with attachments or links.
You need to know the location of the Office templates folder, so that when you create new templates, they are saved to that location, and thus are available for selection when creating new documents.  The steps to find the Templates folder path are …
Familiarize people with the process of utilizing SQL Server views from within Microsoft Access. Microsoft Access is a very powerful client/server development tool. One of the SQL Server objects that you can interact with from within Microsoft Access…
In Microsoft Access, learn the trick to repeating sub-report headings at the top of each page. The problem with sub-reports and headings: Add a dummy group to the sub report using the expression =1: Set the “Repeat Section” property of the dummy…

696 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question