Exchange 2013 - certificate warning for local outlook clients

I've just finished setting up a Microsoft Exchange 2013 environment. We have two servers in two different sites, each site has a domain controller and an exchange server.

We're doing the "internal URL set to the same as the external URL" style of making our SSL certificate work.

The exchange servers are internally known as:

exchangeA.mycompany.local
exchangeB.mycompany.local

And externally, they are known as:

siteA.mycompany.com
siteB.mycompany.com

So on my Internal DNS, I created a zone for "mycompany.com", and set up the records accordingly

siteA.mycompany.com   -->   [[local IP of exchangeA.mycompany.local]]
siteB.mycompany.com   -->   [[local IP of exchangeA.mycompany.local]]

And on my external DNS server (e.g. my web hosting provider), I set up the records:

siteA.mycompany.com   -->   [[WAN IP address of site A's router]]
siteB.mycompany.com   -->   [[WAN IP address of site B's router]]

I also updated the InternalURL / ExternalURL for all virtual directories in the Exchange Administration Center / EAC.

Everything is ALMOST working. Smartphones, Outlook from OUTSIDE the office, and Web access all work fine.

What's not working is regular Outlook clients on the local network:

When I am INSIDE the company on the local network, and I attempt to connect a Microsoft Outlook client to Exchange, I get a certificate warning. It appears Outlook is auto-discovering the "exchangeA.mycompany.local" internal name, instead of the "SiteA.mycompany.com" external name.

The outlook client still works if I push past that warning... but it pops up every time you open Outlook and is incredibly annoying.

certificate warning for local outlook clients
Did I miss something?
LVL 31
Frosty555Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Marc DekeyserSr Premier Field EngineerCommented:
Yes,

Autodiscover internally uses SCPs in AD to discover the exchange servers. Best bet is to created a CAS array with round robin DNS (even if you have only one server) per site and name that the same as your external access records.

That should resokve your cert warnings
0
ChrisCommented:
i would also change how you have the DNS zones setup

create full pinpoint zones for then so you would have a zone called sitea.mycompany.com with a single A record in there
0
Frosty555Author Commented:
Geminon - you lost me... I do have two Exchange servers both of them are holding the Client Access role. AFAIK CAS Arrays do not exist in Exchange 2013 anymore (see: http://www.vmhosts.co.uk/load-balancing-cas-servers-in-exchange-2013/)

Round-robin DNS is a new concept to me... and where are these SCP records? I didn't see them anywhere in DNSMGMT.MSC on my domain controller

How exactly do you think my DNS records should be configured?

One other thing I should mention is that I do have a third hostname  "mail.mycompany.com", which is currently pointing to the same IP address as "sitea.mycompany.com" both internally and externally, but I didn't think it was really relevant. "mail.mycompany.com" is where the employees go when they want to access the webmail remotely. It is also named on the SSL certificate

The SSL cert names these hostnames:

sitea.mycompany.com
siteb.mycompany.com
mail.mycompany.com
autodiscover.mycompany.com
mycompany.com
0
Frosty555Author Commented:
Okay I figured it out.

Geminon - you were right that the Autodiscover service getting the wrong hostname from the SCP records were configured, but you didn't give me enough information to know what to DO about it. In particular - SCP records are stored in Active Directory, not DNS.

This technet article pointed me in the right direction:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchdxb/archive/2012/05/10/troublshooting-autodiscover-exchange-2007-2010.aspx

I needed to go into Active Directory Sites and Services->Services->Microsoft Exchange->First Organization->Administrative Group->Servers->[[EXCHANGEA or EXCHANGEB]]->Protocols->Autodiscover->[[EXCHANGEA or EXHCANGEB]], and update the "serviceBindingInformation" attribute with the correct external hostname as named on the SSL certificate.

If there was a way to do this from the GUI, I wasn't able to find it.

After that, Outlook worked properly.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Frosty555Author Commented:
Pointed me in the right direction
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Exchange

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.