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Initializing Iterators

Posted on 2013-05-15
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Last Modified: 2013-05-27
I have a piece of code converting from Microsoft Visual Studio 6 to 2008. When I compile the following under VS 2008:

	

// Declare the iterators that will hold the earliest requests and subrequests
// and initialize them to NULL
std::set<ShrPtr<Requests> >::const_iterator FirstRequest;
std::set<ShrPtr<SubRequests> >::const_iterator FirstSubRequest;
FirstRequest = NULL;
FirstSubRequest = NULL;

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I get the following compiler error --


Requests.cpp(443) : error C2679: binary '=' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'int' (or there is no acceptable conversion)
        c:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\VC\include\xtree(419): could be 'std::_Tree<_Traits>::const_iterator &std::_Tree<_Traits>::const_iterator::operator =(const std::_Tree<_Traits>::const_iterator &)'
        with
        [
            _Traits=std::_Tset_traits<ShrPtr<Request>,std::less<ShrPtr<Request>>,std::allocator<ShrPtr<Request>>,false>
        ]
        while trying to match the argument list '(std::_Tree<_Traits>::const_iterator, int)'
        with
        [
            _Traits=std::_Tset_traits<ShrPtr<Request>,std::less<ShrPtr<Request>>,std::allocator<ShrPtr<Request>>,false>
        ]

I actually agree with the compiler and I am surprised this compiled at all under Visual Studio 6. The question then becomes how to do this.
0
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Question by:volleyballjerry
3 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 250 total points
ID: 39169328
VC6 is from a time where there was no standardization of C++, that followed later. So the implementation of the designed C++ features was not "standard" thus the above might have worked these days. In a nutshell, if you remove the lines

FirstRequest = NULL;
FirstSubRequest = NULL;

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and replace them e.g. with

FirstRequest = Requests.begin();
FirstSubRequest = SubRequests.begin();

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you should be fine. Alonve the removal of the 'NULL' assignments should do it.
0
 
LVL 33

Assisted Solution

by:sarabande
sarabande earned 250 total points
ID: 39171193
vc6 used simple pointers for most iterators of the stl. that's why you could assign a NULL.

with visual studio all these simple iterators have been implemented by class objects derived from iterator baseclass. those iterators don't support an initialization with NULL.

note, that doesn't mean that you can't use pointers where an iterator was required. for example, the following code will compile at older or newer systems:

int arr[10] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 };
if (std::find(&arr[0], &arr[10], 7) != &arr[10])
    ...

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here, pointers to a c array were used instead of iterators.

Sara
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:volleyballjerry
ID: 39199212
Excellent information and this was a huge help - thank you!
0

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