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Connecting a SAN to a LAN - HP P2000 G3 Modular Smart Array Systems.

Posted on 2013-05-16
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Last Modified: 2013-05-20
Hello.
I work at a small college; we are starting an infrastructure overhaul.  

We are going to implement a SAN, and transfer our four main Servers (DC, Exchange, SIMS, Print Server) to a SAN and visualised environment.  

We have all the equipment, iSCSI leads, switches, iSCSI drives, iSCSI Array system - so therefore I'm doing a bit of research into the best way of connecting all this up.
 
The first step in my research is finding out the best way to the SAN box to our LAN.   Like I said, this is relatively new to me, so just doing a bit of research.  

We have the HP P2000 G3 Modular Smart Array Systems.

So, how would one typically connect the SAN to our LAN?

For example (correct me if I'm wrong, or give advice).

In simplistic terms:
The 8 iSCSI interface ports, on the P2000 SAN box, will connect to two switches (4 ports each) - switch01 / switch02.  

Our host controllers SAN1/SAN2 (which will host the virtualised servers mentioned above) will also connect to switch01 and switch02.  

Our SAN1-SAN2 controllers will then connect to our LAN obviously have dual NICs, so the controllers will be connected to the switches AND the LAN via dual port NICs.

So all traffic, from the LAN, will pass through the SAN1/ SAN2 controllers, onto the switch01/switch02 and then onto the iSCSI drives.

Now, this is my not setup arrangement – this is a work colleagues setup -   my network manager basically, who has never done this before and is not that experienced in this regard.  I’m just trying to get some information so I can “suggest” a better setup, if there is one.  

Is this set-up confusing?  Is it totally wrong.

If I need to make myself clearer, please say.  I do have some questions to ask after I have the bigger picture, such as IP addressing on the iSCSI ports, and VLAN's on the switches.

Thanks
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Question by:SpencerKarnovski
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Expert Comment

by:James H
ID: 39171391
OK. This is one way to explain how this works:

The NIC's on the back on the SAN connect solely to the iSCSI network (which should be a completely unique subnet and VLAN)

The only devices that will "talk" to the SAN's will be your VMWare hosts and the LAN traffic will go through the ESXi hosts.

This is a pretty common setup.
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Author Comment

by:SpencerKarnovski
ID: 39180317
Hello, thanks for the reply - we are using Hyper-V I believe.  

So the NIC's on the back of the SAN box will connect to our managed switch; they will have their own subnet and VLAN.   And traffic to the SAN will obviously come from our HOST VE's.
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James H earned 2000 total points
ID: 39180739
Yes, that is correct. This is a perfectly fine setup, since you are using redundant switching.
Not sure if you did any reading but here is a quick best practice guide for Hyper-V

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd744830.aspx
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Author Comment

by:SpencerKarnovski
ID: 39180777
Ok, thanks - you have been very helpful.
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