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c# pause execution

Posted on 2013-05-17
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Last Modified: 2013-05-18
Ok, ok, i know this should be a scheduled service, but its got too much UI. I want an app to execute a proc from 9-5pm, but be running all the time so it starts every day at 9 and stops and 5pm.
If i use Thread.Sleep(10mins) say, and check the time in a loop would that be ok in terms of reliability (e.g the thread won't get aborted by the runtime if it gets bored) and system resouces? (although aren't extremely limited  but it shouldn't soak up as much than if it was performing higher maths calcs to fill time for example, shouldn't it?)
What other/better way is there?
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Question by:Silas2
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by:Mrunal
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by:Mike Tomlinson
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Noting wrong with polling at longer inervals.  Are you having the thread stopped when you put it to sleep for really long periods (like 16 hours at night)?
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by:Silas2
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Re: "...Are you having the thread stopped when you put it to sleep for really long periods ...? yes, well sleep(ed) if that is the same thing, that was the idea.
Re mroonal: Those links are to SQL server utilities aren't they? This is just .Net (WPF) app. What use are they?
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Mike Tomlinson earned 250 total points
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As far as I know, a thread that sleeps for a very long period of time is in no danger of being discarded.
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by:Silas2
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Have you any idea of the timing mechansim for sending them to sleep/reawaken if you're doing longer periods? (actually i think 20min polls would be ok)
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by:Mike Tomlinson
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Just create a TimeSpan() with your desired duration and pass that to Sleep():

    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromMinutes(20));

If you want to wake up at a specific time, then compute that time and subtract Now() from it:

            // figure out when the next 9:00 am is:
            DateTime dt = DateTime.Today.AddHours(9);
            if (DateTime.Now > dt) // past 9:00 am already...
            {
                dt = dt.AddDays(1); // ...get tomorrow's 9:00 am
            }
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(dt.Subtract(DateTime.Now));
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by:Silas2
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Sorry, I didn't mean that.
I just wondered if the thread had an inbuilt event listener so that the processor would reawaken it at the end of the timespan, or does it sort of 'count-down' from when you start the sleep, so it never really goes to sleep, but just quietly counting down, or....? I was trying to think of some more mechanisms it could use.
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by:Mike Tomlinson
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To be honest, I'm not sure what it's using under the hood to implement its Sleep() mechanism.  Whatever it is, it uses little to no CPU cycles...
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by:Silas2
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Sorry, I'm just a bit interested after being probably one of the only people to do the exam in Microsoft Workflow Foundation 3.5, only to find it was killed off completely the next day! I never bothered with it after that. It was all about this, sleeping processes brought back to life i mean.
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