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Powershell Verify that System Rebooted

Hi,

I have a snippet of a reboot script below - It will force a shutdown on a list of servers, pause for 90 seconds, then check to ensure that the servers are up. Now I can foresee condition where the system hangs at reboot, yet passes the availability check. I can think of a few ways to avoid this situation, i.e. check system uptime, and if uptime is less than x minutes, dump the script. I am requesting some assistance on the best way to check that a system actually rebooted prior to continuing the script. Thank you.

$Time = (get-date -f yyyy-MM-dd_HH.mm.ss)
LogWrite "Server reboots initiated at $Time"

# Gets the server reboot list

$Servers = Get-Content C:\servers.txt
foreach ($Server in $Servers)
{
LogWrite “Issuing remote reboot command to $Server”

# Command to force reboot the remote server
(Get-WmiObject Win32_OperatingSystem -ComputerName $Server).Win32Shutdown(6)
LogWrite "$Server successfully sent restart command"
}

Start-Sleep -s 90

LogWrite "****************************************************"
LogWrite "**************CHECKING ONLINE STATUS****************"
LogWrite "****************************************************"

foreach ($Server in $Servers)
{
    while ( (get-service -Name lanmanserver -ComputerName $Server).Status -ne "Running" ) {
LogWrite "Waiting for $Server ..."
        Start-Sleep -s 15
    }
LogWrite "$Server is Up!"

}
0
wicked212
Asked:
wicked212
2 Solutions
 
Meir RivkinFull stack Software EngineerCommented:
i used this script for remote reboot:
http://www.powershellmagazine.com/2012/11/27/better-restart-computer-cmdlet-in-powershell-3-0/

it has -wait argument which waits until the specified service or feature is available after the computer is restarted for a set of predefined values.
i use WinRM parameter which means that a remote session can be established to the remote server.
0
 
Rajitha ChimmaniCommented:
Instead of checking for the service how about running a ping command?
0
 
serialbandCommented:
You can download the uptime.exe utility from Microsoft to report uptimes.  You'll have to put it in the path on the remote systems.

If you don't want to do that, try piping systeminfo to the find command.

systeminfo|find "System Boot Time"
0
 
becraigCommented:
Here is a an option to add to your script using powershell

$uptime = (Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -computername $server).LastBootUpTime
$sysuptime = (Get-Date) – [System.Management.ManagementDateTimeconverter]::ToDateTime($uptime)

if (($sysuptime.Minutes -GT 10) -and ($sysuptime.Hours -LE 0)) {}

Open in new window


You can probably add some logic to do a wait then a do while Test-connection which if the server responds to the test-connection then you test the uptime.
0
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