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Ubuntu Manually Set Time

Posted on 2013-05-17
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Last Modified: 2013-05-21
I have an Ubuntu server that is about 30 minutes off. It's on a private 10. network with no access to the outside (and no proxy to use) so I syncing with an ntp server doesn't work.

How can I manually tell the server what time it is?
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Question by:brendan-amex
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msifox earned 250 total points
ID: 39175813
console command
date MMDDhhmm[[CC]YY][.ss]
for example
date 05172105
for 17th may 9:05pm
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by:msifox
ID: 39175818
Or reboot, enter bios setup, and do it there.
I did this once on a windows client that thought that I'm not autorized to correct the time setting.
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by:serialband
serialband earned 250 total points
ID: 39176198
After you set the date and time with the date command, sync it to hardware with
hwclock --systohc
so that you don't have to reboot.
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Author Closing Comment

by:brendan-amex
ID: 39186007
Thank you both. The answer from msifox answered my question but the help from serialband is a great suggestion!!
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