Solved

debugging in Visual Studio 2010

Posted on 2013-05-17
1
602 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-17
Hi experts,

In Visual Studio 2010 when I'm debugging a Windows Forms application I set a breakpoint on a certain line of code.
Then when click F5 to start debugging the application the application starts up and runs until it hits my line of code where I set my breakpoint.

Once it stops at my breakpoint I can either do one of the following:

click F5 (to Start Debugging again)
click F8 (Step Into)
click Shift + F8 (Step Over)
click Ctrl+Shift+F8 (Step Out)

When I choose either Start Debugging, Step Into, Step Over, Step Out these operations go forward in my application execution.
What I mean is, if I set my breakpoint at line 9, and then click Step Into, then the next line that gets executed is line 10 and then line 11 and so forth.

So my question is this:

Is there a way to set a breakpoint and then Step Into but go backwards?

or

Is there a way to see a list of execution order of certain methods that are run when my application starts up?

See in my windows forms application that i'm testing, when the application is launched,
a login form comes up.
Once you log in, then the application checks your login credentials against a database and if you are successfully validated then you are taken to the main form.

I want to see all the forms or classes that are hit between the time the user enters their credentials and the time the main form launches after validation is successful?
0
Comment
Question by:maqskywalker
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
1 Comment
 
LVL 75

Accepted Solution

by:
käµfm³d   👽 earned 500 total points
ID: 39175868
You cannot step backwards, but you can drag your "next statement to execute" arrow (the little yellow arrow in the left margin) to previous spots in your current block. In order to see order of execution of methods, you can examine the "Stack Trace" window (Debug->Windows->Call Stack / Ctrl-D, C) to see the current stack of methods that were called up to the breakpoint.

Screenshot
0

Featured Post

Quiz: What Do These Organizations Have In Common?

Hint: Their teams ended up taking quizzes, too.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Creating an analog clock UserControl seems fairly straight forward.  It is, after all, essentially just a circle with several lines in it!  Two common approaches for rendering an analog clock typically involve either manually calculating points with…
Wouldn’t it be nice if you could test whether an element is contained in an array by using a Contains method just like the one available on List objects? Wouldn’t it be good if you could write code like this? (CODE) In .NET 3.5, this is possible…
Come and listen to Percona CEO Peter Zaitsev discuss what’s new in Percona open source software, including Percona Server for MySQL (https://www.percona.com/software/mysql-database/percona-server) and MongoDB (https://www.percona.com/software/mongo-…
Monitoring a network: why having a policy is the best policy? Michael Kulchisky, MCSE, MCSA, MCP, VTSP, VSP, CCSP outlines the enormous benefits of having a policy-based approach when monitoring medium and large networks. Software utilized in this v…

726 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question