Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Preserving uid, gid, size, etc. when coping to an NFS mount point

Posted on 2013-05-20
2
Medium Priority
?
417 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-21
Hello,
I have read several posts on preserving attributes when copying to an NFS mounted file system, however, I haven't arrived at a method to try yet.
What I want to do is copy portions of directory trees with all their files to another NFS mounted file system on a different system for backup purposes.  The restore process needs to be straightforward should I ever need to do that.
Since my work on the systems does not affect anyone else, I can disconnect from the external network while doing the copies if there is a method that is easy but unsecure.  In other words, I would return the systems to their original state security-wise when the copy operations are finished.
Thanks for any suggestions.
Robert

P.S.
Source machine OS: Linux Kernal 2.6.18-164.6.1.el5xen
Destination machine OS: Linux Kernal 2.6.32-279.9.1.el6x86 64 on Centos release 6.3 (Final)
Source is on Centos too but version not available to me at the moment but I know it is < 6.
0
Comment
Question by:RDiersing
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 30

Accepted Solution

by:
serialband earned 2000 total points
ID: 39182413
rsync will do it.

rsync -a /local_dir/ /mounted_dir=

To restore just switch the order:
rsync -a /mounted_dir/ /local_dir/
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:RDiersing
ID: 39186268
Thanks very much for your help.
I tried rsync today in both directions and it worked fine for me.
0

Featured Post

Veeam Task Manager for Hyper-V

Task Manager for Hyper-V provides critical information that allows you to monitor Hyper-V performance by displaying real-time views of CPU and memory at the individual VM-level, so you can quickly identify which VMs are using host resources.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I don't pretend to be an expert at this, but I have found a few things that are useful. I hope that sharing them here will help others, so they will not have to face some rather hard choices. Since I felt this to be a topic of enough importance and…
Let's take a look into the basics of ransomware—how it spreads, how it can hurt us, and why a disaster recovery plan is important.
Email security requires an ever evolving service that stays up to date with counter-evolving threats. The Email Laundry perform Research and Development to ensure their email security service evolves faster than cyber criminals. We apply our Threat…
Is your data getting by on basic protection measures? In today’s climate of debilitating malware and ransomware—like WannaCry—that may not be enough. You need to establish more than basics, like a recovery plan that protects both data and endpoints.…

618 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question