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DFS Namespace not functioning in Parent/Child Domain

Posted on 2013-05-21
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Last Modified: 2013-06-03
I set up a DFS namespace for file servers (both server 2008) in a network that I manage.  We will call it Child for ease at the moment.  We have a parent domain on top of that, we will call Parent.  Anyone in Child can access the namespace with no issues whatsoever.  We have a Remote Access Server (server 2003) at the Parent domain level that people can log into from the Child level.  They cannot, however, access the Child DFS namespace.

Little bit more background, there are also 3 other child domains under the 1 parent set up for different networks, so simply changing the network of the remote server is not a valid option.  I will eventually be creating DFS spaces at each of the other 3 domains as well, and they will all need to be accessible from the remote server but the other 3 respective child domains.

Error message that I receive is that it is not accessible.  Might not have permission to use the network resource.  Configuration information could not be read from the domain controller, either because the machine is unaavailable, or access has been denied.  

The account that I am using to test is an Enterprise Admin account at the Parent level (that can access it when I log into a Child computer with the same account), though the same message appears when I attempt to log into it with a Child user that has access on her Child level computer.

I have verified DNS connectivity.  I can access the domain through explorer and see all the shares, but I cannot open the folder that contains the DFS namespace shares.

I appreciate any assistance that you can provide.
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Question by:Crossroads305
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by:Rob Stone
ID: 39189340
There are some steps to follow in this KB article.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/975440/EN-US?wa=wsignin1.0
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by:Crossroads305
ID: 39201300
I have gone through all of the steps in that article.  I can see the domain controller in Child, I can get to it by FQDN, and I can connect to the servers via the "start" command.  I mapped to the domain itself via FQDN (child.parent.org), and I can map by domain.  I attempt to access the space that way, and it gives me the same message.  I have set both the NTFS permissions and Sharing permissions to allow everyone (simply for testing purposes), and it is still not functioning.

Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
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by:Crossroads305
ID: 39202201
Another piece of this puzzle: I do have the individual locations configured in different sites in AD.  I have a virtual machine that is part of the Child domain in the physical location of the Parent domain: slightly more plain, the same physical site as the remote access server.  I can log in on the virtual machine and access the DFS space.
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by:Crossroads305
ID: 39202293
A point of clarification as well, the virtual machine uses the same DNS servers as the remote access server.
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Crossroads305 earned 0 total points
ID: 39204299
I was finally able to solve this myself.  I went into the Local Area Connection the server users, went to the TCP/IP v4 settings, and went to avanced.  Under the DNS section, I changed the DNS suffixes from parent domain to the list I created.  When I added the Child domain to the suffix list, DFS worked immediately.
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by:Crossroads305
ID: 39215607
I was able to solve this myself.
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