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Allowing a user to print from WLAN to LAN to USB printer

Posted on 2013-05-21
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Last Modified: 2013-06-05
I have a sonicwall tz215 with a sonicpoint attached and I want to setup a rule that allows the user on the wireless network to print to the LAN printer (printer attached via usb) only. I can get it to work if I allow all traffic but I want to ONLY allow the wireless user to print to the computer with the printer attached via usb.
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Question by:portillosjohn
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6 Comments
 
LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Ugo Mena
ID: 39185362
If the printer is connected to a specific computer via USB, you will need to share the printer from the computer (it is connected to) and then allow traffic from WLAN to that specific  computer's LAN IP address.

Since the printer does not have a specific IP address (when connected directly via USB) it is unlikely that you will be able to open traffic to that printer alone.

Is it safe to assume that the printer does not have a network card?
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Author Comment

by:portillosjohn
ID: 39185390
That is correct. No network card. I would also like to allow the same setup to LPT if possible.
There is no way to setup a rule for just print traffic?
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LVL 13

Expert Comment

by:Ugo Mena
ID: 39185499
You can certainly map the LPT1-3 ports on each machine to a specific IP using something like :
NET USE LPT1 \\server\shared_printer (Windows)
or Printer sharing (Mac OS)
But you will still need to share the printer from the computer it is directly connected to. Then open traffic to the computer LAN IP from your WLAN
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:eerwalters
ID: 39185659
What OS version is the PC hosting the USB attached printer?
What OS version is the PC needing to print to it?
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Author Comment

by:portillosjohn
ID: 39185670
Its a windows 7 laptop printing to an xp professional machine with usb printer attached.
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LVL 7

Accepted Solution

by:
eerwalters earned 2000 total points
ID: 39185761
I recommend to not use normal Windows printer sharing but to use LPD/LPR.
   This will allow you to...
      ...not advertise the USB printer to your normal Windows network
      ...only allow port 515 traffic for printing to the XP workstation, if desired
 

There will be 4 basic steps to resolve the issue
    1- Setup the USB printer on the Windows XP PC
    2- Install TCP/IP Print Server (LPD) on the Windows XP PC hosting the USB printer
    3- Install LPR port monitor on the Windows 7 workstation(s) from which you want to print
    4- Setup a Windows printer on the same workstation from step 3, but use LPR printing.


Step 1 - Setup the USB printer on the Windows XP workstation, if it is not already setup and printing normally.


Step 2 - Enable LPD on the Windows XP computer  (This will allow you to have another way to get the job into the USB attached print queue)
    a- GoTo Start, Click on Run
    b- Type appwiz.cpl in the "Open" box and hit Enter
    c- Click on Add/Remove Windows Components in the left pane
    d- Highlight Other Network File and Print Services & Click on Details
    e- Check the box next to Print Services for UNIX
    f- Click on OK
    g- Click on Next
    h- Click on Finish
    i- GoTo Start, Click on Run
    j- Type services.msc in the "Open" box and hit Enter
    k- Start the TCP/IP Print Server service


Step 3 - Enable LPR on the Windows 7 workstation(s) that will need to print
    a- GoTo Start and type appwiz.cpl in the search box and hit Enter
    b- Click on Turn Windows features on and off in the left pane
    c- Click the + sign next to Print and Document Services
    d- Enable the feature for LPR Port Monitor
    e- Click OK
    f- You may be prompted to Restart


Step 4 - Setup a printer to use LPR on the Windows 7 workstation(s)
    a- GoTo Start | Devices and Printers
    b- Add a Printer
    c- Add a Local Printer
    d- Select Create a new Port
    e- Select LPR Port from the drop down menu
    f- Click Next
    g- In the top field ("Name or address of server providing LPD"), enter the DNS name OR the TCP/IP address of the Windows XP workstation that hosts the USB printer  
    h- In the bottom field ("Name of printer or print queue on that server"), enter the name of the desired Windows printer from the PC hosting the USB printer
    i- Click OK
    j- Continue onward with a normal Windows printer setup by picking the desired print driver and naming the printer until finished
    k- Open the newly created printer's properties
    l- GoTo the Ports tab
    m- Uncheck Enable Bidirectional support if it's enabled
    n- Click Apply
    o- Click on the General tab
    p- Send a test page
    q- Click OK to close
 

Notes:
    1- This methodology will allow the desired Windows 7 workstation(s) to print to the USB connected printer on the Windows XP PC without having to modify the permissions, use a guest account or even share the printer via normal Windows sharing.  
    2- LPR uses 11 ports by default so if a sending workstation needs to send more than 11 print jobs within two minutes, let me know and I can explain how to increase the # of available ports. Without the change there would be a delay on the 12th print job of a couple minutes, but it would still print.  I only mention this because if this user prints lots of small jobs in a short period of time, it will be necessary.  I have found that this is not necessary for 97% of all of the workstations that I have encountered.
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