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Bruce CorsonFlag for United States of America

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Mounting hfs+ partitions with systemrescuecd

When trying to mount a Mac drive using Linux on a Windows computer, but I am getting the message "mount: unknown filesystem type 'hfs'".

I am using sysrescuecd. Gparted tells me the system on my partition is hfs+

I did this:
     
1. mkdir /mnt/macpart      
2. mount -t hfs /dev/sdc2 /mnt/macpart

I then get the "mount: unknown filesystem type 'hfs'"

(I tried adding a + to hfs but that didn't work.)
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caltain
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I'm still getting the same message as before. Just want to read and copy it, but it won't mount. Also won't mount when I plug it into my Mac USB drive.

Thanks...any more ideas are welcomed!
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caltain, I think you've hit on the issue. This is a crashed Mac drive from an iMac. Before I removed and replace it, I booted the iMac with sysrescuecd and was able to get mount and get data from three of the four user names on the crashed disk. Not knowing any better, I was just using the command "mount /dev/sdc2 /mnt/macpart" (for instance) with no reference to hfs or hfsplus.

It was once I had the drive out and discovered there was a fourth, major data-containing, user that I hadn't seen that I resorted to trying to mount it through a USB connection.

Last night I tried for the fourth time to mount it directly (USB) to my personal Mac laptop, and that user name came up and was populated; I got to copy all of it. So the problem is solved. I wonder if this was possible because, as you said, the journey on the drive was no longer populated.

Thank you!

Now, I have to go research what that means (journey on the drive).

Serialband, thank you too. I awarded you points as well for the useful  http://www.catacombae.org/hfsx.html link.
You're welcome.  I only suggested that because I didn't know that you had previously read the disk and were just trying to read an additional user partition.

That should be journal not journey.  Disk journals record actions before they compeleted to the disk.  It helps recover from crashes more easily.  When you start up the system it should run through the journal and complete and not leave the disk/data in an unstable state.  All the non-journaled filesystems may require "massaging" with fsck, chkdisk, or disk utility to fix disk errors before you can start again.   Journals are now a standard feature on many filesystems and reduce the problems from system crashes.  HFS+ and NTFS have Disk journals.
Wow, thank you. One more piece of the puzzle for me. Experts Exchange is great, and glad I had to opportunity to learn from you.
You are welcome.  Thanks serialband for your excellent concise description of journaling.

Cheers!
caltain