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Migrating SBS 2008 to Windows Server 2012 with Exchange 2013

Posted on 2013-05-21
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Last Modified: 2013-07-02
I have a client who is expanding rapidly and needs to migrate from a SBS 2008 to a Windows Server 2012 STD running Exchange 2013.  

Does anyone know of any good reference guides available that focus on this migration?

Thank you in advance.
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Question by:RJCCTS
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Cliff Galiher earned 500 total points
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You aren't going to find one. SBS migration documents were (relatively) easy to write because the architecture was necessarily limited in scope. When you get to enterprise products, things change drastically.

For example, you say the reason you need STD is because the client is expanding rapidly. That means you need to seriously consider distributing workloads. Do you run DNS on your fileserver or do you split them up? Do you run the certificate authority on your DHCP server? In an environment that heavily uses BYOD and you want to use certificate authentication, isolating the CA is a good idea.

There are dozens of combinations and moving parts and thus there is no one-size-fits-all (or even one-size-fits-most) architectures at that size. In the SBS sized world, Essentials is still the way to go and they have an official migration doc. But at larger sizes, you need to start making serious decisions about where workloads go and how many you choose to coexist based on security, I/O, CPU, virtualization, and licensing considerations.

If Essentials and its accompanying migration doc isn't good enough then you will want to migrate per-role, not a whiz-bang all-at-once migration. Like building a house, you want to blueprint your network first. Have a good idea of how many OS installs you will have (physical and virtual) and where each role will live. Then migrate one role at a time until your final network matches your blueprint.

TechNet has excellent documentation on migrating roles. You just follow each role migration individually. This includes designing and migrating Exchange. Maybe you want the CAS and Mailbox server collocated. Maybe you need to split them up. Maybe you plan to use UM. These must also be mapped, planned, and then follow the Exchange migration guidance, per role, not all at once.

I know it isn't a simple "go here" answer, but it is the most accurate one.
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