Solved

explanation of hierarchical notation of turing machine

Posted on 2013-05-21
7
249 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-24
I have difficulties to understand the hierarchical notation of turing machine which is shown in the attached photo. Note that this is not assignment , it is already question and solution in the book but i didn't understand the solution. Please tell me the solution step by step , i didn't understand it.(i must understand it because it can be asked in final exam.) Or if you find and understand similar questions , you can explain it too.
Similar examples and the topic exist in the below links:
link
downloads .word

Any help is much appreciated.
turing-example.png
0
Comment
Question by:codeBuilder
7 Comments
 
LVL 84

Expert Comment

by:ozo
ID: 39186290
What question, and what solution are you asking for an explanation of?
0
 
LVL 31

Expert Comment

by:GwynforWeb
ID: 39186501
Your question is unclear and I am not exactly sure what you mean by Hierarchical Notation. The mechanics and underlying principles of Tiring Machines are very simple. The notation is a classic example of a notation being more complex than the concept it is trying to represent.
0
 

Author Comment

by:codeBuilder
ID: 39186795
I assigned a png file. There are 2 questions and their answers in this png. But i didn't understand the answer. I want to learn solution step by step..
0
The Eight Noble Truths of Backup and Recovery

How can IT departments tackle the challenges of a Big Data world? This white paper provides a roadmap to success and helps companies ensure that all their data is safe and secure, no matter if it resides on-premise with physical or virtual machines or in the cloud.

 

Author Comment

by:codeBuilder
ID: 39186802
What does
 R -> U R^2U a L^2U a
mean in the first question in png ?
Could you explain it?
0
 
LVL 37

Accepted Solution

by:
TommySzalapski earned 500 total points
ID: 39187440
U: write a blank
R^2U: shift right until you hit a blank twice (so skip the first blank and stop at the second one)
a: print the a
L^2U: shift left until you hit a blank twice
a: print the a
0
 
LVL 37

Expert Comment

by:TommySzalapski
ID: 39187872
In your lecture notes that you posted they define some shorthand. Technically "shift right until the read head is over x" is not a valid Turing machine command, but you can create a machine that would do that. They use R subscript x to indicate such a machine.
And of course R^2 subscript x means do it twice.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:codeBuilder
ID: 39195651
clear explanation
0

Featured Post

Three Reasons Why Backup is Strategic

Backup is strategic to your business because your data is strategic to your business. Without backup, your business will fail. This white paper explains why it is vital for you to design and immediately execute a backup strategy to protect 100 percent of your data.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Lithium-ion batteries area cornerstone of today's portable electronic devices, and even though they are relied upon heavily, their chemistry and origin are not of common knowledge. This article is about a device on which every smartphone, laptop, an…
When we purchase storage, we typically are advertised storage of 500GB, 1TB, 2TB and so on. However, when you actually install it into your computer, your 500GB HDD will actually show up as 465GB. Why? It has to do with the way people and computers…
This is a video describing the growing solar energy use in Utah. This is a topic that greatly interests me and so I decided to produce a video about it.
Finds all prime numbers in a range requested and places them in a public primes() array. I've demostrated a template size of 30 (2 * 3 * 5) but larger templates can be built such 210  (2 * 3 * 5 * 7) or 2310  (2 * 3 * 5 * 7 * 11). The larger templa…

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question