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How Can I Remove RPM Packages From an AIX System?

Posted on 2013-05-22
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Last Modified: 2013-05-23
I have installed a number of RPM packages on AIX 5.3 and 6.1 systems. The problem is that I can't find them - that is, they're not showing up in the report generated by the lslpp report. I'm contemplating installing more of these, but I'd like to know that I can remove them. Are there additional arguments for viewing RPM packages with the lslpp command, or is there another set of commands altogether for manipulating RPM packages on AIX systems?
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Question by:babyb00mer
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comfortjeanius earned 500 total points
ID: 39189151
Did you try

rpm -qa | grep -I <packagename>

then

rpm -e <package name>
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