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Find and Replace in Access

Posted on 2013-05-23
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I use the Ctrl F button a lot when searching through access forms. I always have to change the letting for "Look In" and "Match". By default the "Look In" is the current highlighted field and I have to change it to the whole form. The Match by default is always "Whole Field" and I have to change it to "Any Part of Field".

Is there anyway to change the defaults on this? So when I hit Ctrl F I don't have to change those? Thanks!
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Question by:cansevin
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pdebaets earned 2000 total points
ID: 39192431
This link shoud help: http://www.pcreview.co.uk/forums/find-ctrl-f-default-settings-t3647609.html

You will probably have to close and open the database for the changes to take effect.
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by:cansevin
ID: 39192584
Thanks!
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 39192625
Some notes...

Unless *every* field in the table needs to be searched, it may be resource intensive to search the "Whole Form"

It is possible to build a query system to do this and skip the dialog box altogether.
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