Solved

Find and Replace in Access

Posted on 2013-05-23
3
362 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-23
I use the Ctrl F button a lot when searching through access forms. I always have to change the letting for "Look In" and "Match". By default the "Look In" is the current highlighted field and I have to change it to the whole form. The Match by default is always "Whole Field" and I have to change it to "Any Part of Field".

Is there anyway to change the defaults on this? So when I hit Ctrl F I don't have to change those? Thanks!
0
Comment
Question by:cansevin
3 Comments
 
LVL 12

Accepted Solution

by:
pdebaets earned 500 total points
ID: 39192431
This link shoud help: http://www.pcreview.co.uk/forums/find-ctrl-f-default-settings-t3647609.html

You will probably have to close and open the database for the changes to take effect.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:cansevin
ID: 39192584
Thanks!
0
 
LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 39192625
Some notes...

Unless *every* field in the table needs to be searched, it may be resource intensive to search the "Whole Form"

It is possible to build a query system to do this and skip the dialog box altogether.
0

Featured Post

Ransomware-A Revenue Bonanza for Service Providers

Ransomware – malware that gets on your customers’ computers, encrypts their data, and extorts a hefty ransom for the decryption keys – is a surging new threat.  The purpose of this eBook is to educate the reader about ransomware attacks.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

The first two articles in this short series — Using a Criteria Form to Filter Records (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6069.html) and Building a Custom Filter (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6070.html) — discuss in some detail how a form can be…
Describes a method of obtaining an object variable to an already running instance of Microsoft Access so that it can be controlled via automation.
Basics of query design. Shows you how to construct a simple query by adding tables, perform joins, defining output columns, perform sorting, and apply criteria.
With Microsoft Access, learn how to specify relationships between tables and set various options on the relationship. Add the tables: Create the relationship: Decide if you’re going to set referential integrity: Decide if you want cascade upda…

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question