Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Determine if 32-bit or 64-bit version of Access is installed

Posted on 2013-05-24
6
Medium Priority
?
3,166 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-31
I am distributing an Access based application using .accde files. My software first runs an executable created in Visual Basic 2010 which checks the version of the local file against the version on a network share and copies the file from the network share to a local folder if it is newer. The problem is that some of my customers have 64-bit Access installed and when they open the .accde file created in 32-bit access, they receive the message 'This database was created with the 32-bit version of Microsoft Access. Please open it with the 32-bit version of Microsoft Access.' I would like to be able to reliably determine in my visual basic program whether 64-bit Microsoft Access in installed so that I can copy the appropriate .accde file (64-bit or 32-bit) to the local computer. Is there a registry key I can look for or can I analyze the msaccess.exe file itself?
0
Comment
Question by:Steve_Reschke
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
6 Comments
 
LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
Guru Ji earned 750 total points
ID: 39194202
Hi,

I am running Win 7 64 bit and I know that if you have Office 32 bit application then your registry path is as following : "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Common\InstallRoot" Path.

And if you have 64 bit application then your registry path is as following: "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Common\InstallRoot"

I am sure this should apply to Win 32 bit machines too. Hope that helps
0
 

Expert Comment

by:AndyHoughtonCanada
ID: 39194228
I would use the registry keys. Here is something I have used for Outlook. You would have to use something similar for MS Access.

Check this out: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee681792.aspx



If you have included Outlook 2013 in your Office 2013 installation, Outlook sets a registry key named Bitness of type REG_SZ on the computer on which it is installed. The Bitness registry key indicates whether the Outlook 2013 installation is 32-bit or 64-bit. This might be useful to administrators who are interested in auditing computers to determine the installed versions of Office 2013 in their organization.

Registry path: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook


Registry key: Bitness


Value: either x86 or x64




If you have included Outlook 2013 in your Office 2013 installation, Outlook sets a registry key named Bitness of type REG_SZ on the computer on which it is installed. The Bitness registry key indicates whether the Outlook 2013 installation is 32-bit or 64-bit. This might be useful to administrators who are interested in auditing computers to determine the installed versions of Office 2013 in their organization.

Registry path: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook


Registry key: Bitness


Value: either x86 or x64
0
NFR key for Veeam Agent for Linux

Veeam is happy to provide a free NFR license for one year.  It allows for the non‑production use and valid for five workstations and two servers. Veeam Agent for Linux is a simple backup tool for your Linux installations, both on‑premises and in the public cloud.

 

Author Comment

by:Steve_Reschke
ID: 39194257
The Bitness key is present for most but not all installations of Office. If Access is installed as a separate product, that registry key is not present.
0
 
LVL 58

Assisted Solution

by:Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 750 total points
ID: 39194471
I would create a small DB to test and have it write a flag of some type (file on disk, registry entry, orrecord in a table), which the VB program can then read.

The test is to check for the compiler directive Win64.   If that is true, then the VBA code is running 64 bit.  If false, then it's running 32bit. ie.

#if Win64 then
   ' Do something to indicate running in 64 bit mode
#else
    ' Do something to indicate running in 32 bit mode
#end if

  Call this small DB from your VB 6 program (ie. Shell() or fire up Access with OLE automation), run the one procedure with the check, then quit), then continue on in the VB program.

Jim.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Steve_Reschke
ID: 39211632
I have tried both of these accepted solutions and found them viable. I have yet to find an installation that has Access 64-bit that does not have the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Common\InstallRoot registry key and because that solution is easier to implement I found it to be the best answer.
Thank you for your help.
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Did you know that more than 4 billion data records have been recorded as lost or stolen since 2013? It was a staggering number brought to our attention during last week’s ManageEngine webinar, where attendees received a comprehensive look at the ma…
Traditionally, the method to display pictures in Access forms and reports is to first download them from URLs to a folder, record the path in a table and then let the form or report pull the pictures from that folder. But why not let Windows retr…
Basics of query design. Shows you how to construct a simple query by adding tables, perform joins, defining output columns, perform sorting, and apply criteria.
What’s inside an Access Desktop Database. Will look at the basic interface, Navigation Pane (Database Container), Tables, Queries, Forms, Report, Macro’s, and VBA code.

610 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question