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Upgrade of SQL Server 2005

Posted on 2013-05-24
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Last Modified: 2013-05-28
Hi,
We would like to upgrade our current version of SQL server 2005 to 2012.  Is this version stable?  It seems like going to 2008 is already outdated?

Thoughts?

Thanks,
hefterr
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Question by:hefterr
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by:Brian Crowe
ID: 39195461
There is also another version in between: 2008 R2 which is essentially 2010.  2012 is fairly widely used and I would suggest going to 2012 if you're going to go to all the trouble of upgrading.
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by:hefterr
ID: 39195498
How painful is the upgrade to 2012?  Do you think the upgrade to 2012 is the same effort as to 2012 or 2008?
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by:Brian Crowe
Brian Crowe earned 250 total points
ID: 39195528
I personally haven't done an upgrade to 2012 but all of my upgrade efforts in the past have been relatively painless.  The only exception has been some CLR procedures.  Obviously I would recommend installing whatever you choose in a test environment and walking through the upgrade there and then reattaching test versions of any applications that point to it and doing some regression testing.
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by:hefterr
ID: 39195547
We are not using CLR procedures.  I assume there still is a Management Studio and it has not been revamped too much?
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by:Brian Crowe
ID: 39195589
You won't feel lost in the new SSMS and I'm sure you'll appreciate the intellisense in the query editor that was introduced with 2008.
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didnthaveaname earned 250 total points
ID: 39195723
The move isn't bad at all. I am currently migrating a 2005 to 2012.  Some of the things you should be aware of involve the fact that if your 2005 instance is sitting on windows 2003, you will have to migrate to a new server that is on server 2008, 2008r2, or 2012 (you would need a migration vs. in place upgrade also if you are switching from 32 bit to 64 bit binaries for SQL Server).  In those instances, you would be looking at a migration and not an in place upgrade.  You have several options available for that, I would suggest taking a look at my post here: http://www.experts-exchange.com/Microsoft/Development/MS-SQL-Server/SQL_Server_2008/Q_28121746.html#a39148501.

Beyond that, you'll want to check your deprecated/discontinued features moving from 2005 to 2012, to ensure that you don't rely on anything that is discontinued:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144262%28v=sql.105%29.aspx

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144262%28v=sql.110%29.aspx

Beyond that, if you have mixed mode authentication (and frankly, even if you don't, this saves time), there is a link in the article regarding migration options to copy over the server login principals which I would encourage you to take a look at.  If you do have SQL Server authenticated logins, it will ensure that the SIDs in the new server are the same as the old and whenever you restore databases, you won't have to remap the users.  Hope that helps!
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by:hefterr
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We are migratin from a 32 bit dedicated server to a 64 bit virtual/cloud environment and we are using this check out period/opportunity to upgrade SQL server 2005.  I belive the OS will be Win server 2008.

Any thoughts on 32 bit versus 64 bit?

Thanks again.
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by:didnthaveaname
ID: 39195797
I personally like 64 bit vs 32 bit for the simple fact that large memory support is native. There are other reasons to make the move, I encourage you to check out this article: http://www.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2005/en/us/64-bit.aspx
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by:didnthaveaname
ID: 39195808
Also, since you mentioned moving to a virtual environment, I would recommend additional consideration be given to how you want to configure your storage. Here's a good comparison: http://download.microsoft.com/download/D/F/8/DF89D22D-39C8-4728-A990-3BD4467891B7/HighPerformanceSQLServerWorkloadsOnHyper-V_Final.docx
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by:hefterr
ID: 39195812
@didnthaveaname
I personally like 64 bit vs 32 bit for the simple fact that large memory support is native.

I understand this.  But sometimes there are quirky problems with the 64 bit versions.
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by:didnthaveaname
ID: 39195819
http://download.microsoft.com/download/0/E/8/0E812734-4EC1-4D23-A1F5-0627B07A7484/SQL2008inHyperV2008.pdf - sorry, I'm replying off my phone and had the wrong URL in my clipboard, though I suspect the other is useful as well.  Also, I'm not sure about the complexity of your environment, but I have yet to run across any quirks. That said, we migrated from 2005 64 bit, so there may be more potential for quirkiness in your case. I haven't investigated enough to comfortably make a statement either way.
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by:hefterr
ID: 39202034
Thanks for your help.
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