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Server Router interference

Posted on 2013-05-25
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I  just installed a new server in my small office (server + 4 workstations). I also have cable modem internet with a fixed IP. The address scheme for my server is 10.0.0.X, the router is an older Linksys with the 192.168.1.1 address. I can not get the router,server to pass signals to the cable modem although each is working properly. The Linksys router only provides wireless access outside the office network and thus is not integral to the network and is really an access point only in function. What would be the simplest solution to the problem? And one last thing, the "server" is not a full-blown rack server, just a I-7 processor PC with 8G memory running mirrored drives and Windows server 2008 Enterprise, so the server has only one ethernet connection which runs to a Gigabit Switch, which connects to all the workstations and the Linksys. The WAN port on the Linksys connects to the cable-modem.
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Question by:LarryForehand
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Randy Downs earned 500 total points
ID: 39196618
It sounds like the router is between the cable modem and your new network. If you don't need a routing capabilities then it would be easier to use a switch.

You could also try changing the network setting to 10.0.0.x but you would need to limit DHCP and static ips to be different than those handed out by cable.
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by:LarryForehand
ID: 39196635
It I run the ethernet from the cable modem to the switch (bypassing the Linksys router), the server already handles the network addressing, so that seems OK. Can I still plug the router into the switch and use it as an access point only? If I do that will the built-in address (192xxxx) be a problem. I suggested that to the Sudden Link tech. He was concerned that their modems (ARRIS) can lock up if more that 12 users send traffic. With only 4 workstations and perhaps a few smart phone users, I don't see that as a big problem.
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by:LarryForehand
ID: 39196647
Re-reading you post, I don't know exactly what you mean by changing the network setting. Right now the server should be addressing everything on the network inside the router with 10.0.0.X addresses. The server address is 10.0.0.20. I have read on some networking sites that you can essentially go port by port and set the router to pass all port traffic to the server, i.e., put the server address (10.0.;0.20) manually in the router for all port addresses. That seemed complicated to me, if there is a simpler way.
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by:Randy Downs
ID: 39196650
Sure you can use the router as an access point. It will still hand out the 192.x network ips you mentioned. Limit the DHCP range to just a few connections if you are concerned about lockups
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by:Randy Downs
ID: 39196652
By the way, I tried making a router work on the same network as my cable (10.0.0.x) and it refused to work so that's not a viable option.
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by:Randy Downs
ID: 39196655
The switch is the best way to go and keep your network using the ips you like. Disregard the part about forcing the router to use the same network as cable. It's not a good idea.
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by:Randy Downs
ID: 39196659
If you really wanted to stay on the same network with the cable modem using a router you would need to change subnets and route accordingly between them. Switch is so uch simpler for a small network.
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by:LarryForehand
ID: 39196661
Thanks to everyone thus far, I will first try bypassing the Linksys completely and see how that goes. I will leave the question open for now so any more thoughts would be appreciated
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by:smckeown777
ID: 39196823
What's the end game here? Are you using the new server as DHCP for your network? If so then as @Number-1 mentioned you should take the Linksys out of the equation...

If you want to use it as an AP that's also fine - but you need to change its internal IP from 192.168.x.x to something in your 10.0.0.x network for 2 reasons

1) To allow you to access it should you need to change any settings on it
2) To use as an AP you need to connect the Linksys to the switch using its LAN ports(i.e. don't connect it using its WAN port at all)

Then all should work I think...
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by:LarryForehand
ID: 39197214
End game: Reasonably secure inter office network with wireless access for employees "smart phones", patients who might want to use internet (probably one or two at the most). Use of static IP from Suddenlink to eventually allow for remote access to data files. Yes the server is the DHCP. Yes, I do know if I can re-address the Linksys that it would connect thru a LAN port to the switch, but thanks, it never hurts to make things painfully clear.
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