?
Solved

VMWare ESXi 4.1 Scratch partition?

Posted on 2013-05-27
3
Medium Priority
?
908 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-27
Hi,

I have a lab-environment with ESXi 5.1-servers, they are installed on USB-drives.

There is a production environment I work with, which has ESX 4.1 servers, these are installed to SSD-drives. However, for config, choice has been made to move ONLY the scratch-partition to a SAN-drive.
Reason = SSD’s would be worn-out due to frequent read-writes.

Questions:

*is the reason above  a valid reason/reason to move the scratch-partition, also for (my) ESXi 5?
I always understood, you could remove the USB-drive once server has been booted, since everything runs in RAM (never tried it though)?

*if moving scratch-partion is advisable, is there an article + is there performance gain?

Please advise.
J.
0
Comment
Question by:janhoedt
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
3 Comments
 

Author Comment

by:janhoedt
ID: 39199128
Thanks! Somehow contradictory however:


When booting from USB/SD keep in mind that once ESXi is loaded, it runs from memory and there is very little ongoing I/O to the boot device.


Because USB/SD devices are sensitive to high amounts of I/O the installer will not place the scratch partition on a USB/SD device.  Instead, the installer first scans for a local 4GB vfat partition, if it doesn’t find one it will then scan for a local VMFS volume on which to create a scratch directory.  If no local vfat partition or VMFS volume is found, as a last resort the installer will put the scratch partition in “/tmp/scratch” (i.e. put scratch on the local ramdisk).  If this happens it’s a good idea to manually reconfigure the scratch partition after the install.


So, first it says: it runs in memory BUT you should reconfigure the scratch partition to another drive if no local drive is available since it highly used ....
0
 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
Subhashish Laha earned 2000 total points
ID: 39199230
Hope this clears your doubt

This “scratch partition” is used for storing

- vm-support dumps
- log files
- userworld swapfiles (if enabled).

When using Boot-from-SAN or USB scratch partitions are not automatically created and the above mentioned files will be stored in a RAM disk. This means that after a reboot these files will be gone. Therefore, from an operational point of view it is a good idea to manually specify or script the scratch partition after the installation. You could use a VMFS volume for it and create multiple folders per server to store the respective files.

http://ituda.com/vmware-esx-scratch-partition-and-logging/
0

Featured Post

ATEN's HDBaseT Presentation at InfoComm 2017

Hear ATEN Product Manager YT Liang review HDBaseT technology, highlighting ATEN’s latest solutions as they relate to real-world applications during her presentation at the HDBaseT booth at InfoComm 2017.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

In this article, I will show you HOW TO: Install VMware Tools for Windows on a VMware Windows virtual machine on a VMware vSphere Hypervisor 6.5 (ESXi 6.5) Host Server, using the VMware Host Client. The virtual machine has Windows Server 2016 instal…
In this article, I will show you HOW TO: Perform a Physical to Virtual (P2V) Conversion the easy way from a computer backup (image).
Teach the user how to configure vSphere clusters to support the VMware FT feature Open vSphere Web Client: Verify vSphere HA is enabled: Verify netowrking for vMotion and FT Logging is in place or create it: Turn On FT for a virtual machine: Verify …
This video shows you how easy it is to boot from ISO images for virtual machines with the ISO images stored on a local datastore on the ESXi host.
Suggested Courses

752 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question