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format external harddrive on windows7

using a 600gig external usb hard drive that plugs into wall outlet

was working
I lost the original wall outlet plug 12V and I formatted drive

the light lights
but my windows7 computers state that bad device
or do not recognize device

so either my formatting or using another plug is bad

is there a way to recognize drive at bootup or format drive differently
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rgb192
Asked:
rgb192
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11 Solutions
 
John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Go to Computer, right click, Manage, Disk Management and see if you can see the drive and delete the partition(s) on it. Then format again.

... Thinkpads_User
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serialbandCommented:
Does the plug put out the correct or sufficient wattage/power to power the drive?  If you need a 20 Watt plug and you only have one sufficient to producing 16 Watts, it may not be enough and might cause errors as you attemp to write to the drive.  You can always plug in a more powerful plug at the same voltage, because it will use just the amperage it needs.
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jcimarronCommented:
rgb192--
"using a 600gig external usb hard drive that plugs into wall outlet"  Yes, but that should be a plug that converts 120V to 12V.
"I lost the original wall outlet plug 12V "
So what did you do to power the external drive?  Did you plug it into 120V?  Sounds like you fried the external drive.
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rgb192Author Commented:
So what did you do to power the external drive?  Did you plug it into 120V?  Sounds like you fried the external drive.

how to tell if drive is fried
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nobusCommented:
you have to tell us in detail what you did -otherwise we have no way of knowing what happened

>>  how to tell if drive is fried   <<  a vast range of options : it stinks, does not turn on, does not spin up, is not recognised in the bios, or in windows, has burnt marks in connectors, cables or logic s
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Take the drive out of external USB box and connect it to the SATA connector on the motherboard. See if Windows detects it then. Note, Windows must be turned off during drive connecting/disconnecting to SATA port.
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rgb192Author Commented:
>>
>>  how to tell if drive is fried   <<  a vast range of options : it stinks, does not turn on, does not spin up, is not recognised in the bios, or in windows, has burnt marks in connectors, cables or logic s

it makes noises (spins I think)

how to test with bios
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
If the drive is fried then BIOS will not see it at all. Or will see with wrong parameters.
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rgb192Author Commented:
if bios sees

can I use bios to format
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nobusCommented:
the bios is not used for formatting or testing; though "some" laptops have that option - but i don't kno if that also works on external drives - i guess not, since the bios would need the usb drivers

you need to use a bootable cd, like the windows install cd, or another tool  from the UBCD :
http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/download.html
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
BIOS can only show the size and name of the HDD, set its order. But not formatting. If BIOS does not see the drive then it is a brick.
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serialbandCommented:
What brand drive is it?  If you used the same voltage adapter, it's not likely to have been fried.  The more likely thing to have happened in that case is that your replacement adapter doesn't have sufficient power to allow the drive to function properly.

Several of the single external drive units (3-1/2") use a 12 Volt, 2 Amp adapter.  This means that you can use any 12V, 2A adapter or anything with a larger amperage like a 12V, 10A and it will work just fine.  The 12V adapter will not push more current than your circuit will take.  There are also multidrive units that need a 3A or 4A plug.  These adapters, if they're the same physical size plug, can work on the single drive units, but the 2A, single drive adapter can't power these.

If you have a 12V, 1A adapter, it wouldn't provide sufficient current to maintain the power needed by your disk to spin up fully and power the circuitry.  If you've plugged only the USB from these drives to the computer without power, the computer may detect the drive in BIOS.  USB provides 5V, 1A to the circuit, which may be just enough to detect a drive, and you basically get a phantom drive, but won't be able to access data.  This is what I suspect is likely to have happened.

The only time you'll actually fry your drive is when you use an adapter with too much voltage.  A 24 Volt adapter will fry your drive's circuits.  If you undervolted the adapter, by putting a 9V plug, it might power your drive, but it's completely unlikely to fry your drive.  Same goes for the 12V plugs.


If you are using laptop sized, 2-1/2" drives, you may need extra power if you have IDE internal drives that were 250 MB to 500 MB.  USB wasn't quite sufficient to power them.  External drive cases for those models included a split USB cable that you used to plug into 2 USB ports to get extra power.
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jcimarronCommented:
rgb192--Did you plug the external drive into the wall socket with an adapter that converts 120V to something other than 12V?  Look at the label on the adapter.  It should show what the output voltage is.
This assumes that the lost adapter was 12V DC.  
If the adapter you used delivers more than 12V Output, I would expect the drive will have been damaged.
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nobusCommented:
i already asked him to post details of what he did - but got nothing...
not very cooperating
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rgb192Author Commented:
upon examination of all these answers I will get the wall plug that came with the device and then try again

thanks for input
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