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Pc shuts itself down

After replacing a power supply where the fan was not turning, and replacing a broken fan in the case, the computer now starts up fine, but the power shuts off after about 3 minutes.  Sometimes after restarting, there is a message that "the cpu experienced a thermal issue (overheating)"
All fans, including the one on the cpu are running.  I've used compressed air to clean all the fans.  This computer has two large video cards, and so uses a 1000V power supply.

Any suggestions as to why it would be overheating when all cooling fans are working?
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a1electric
Asked:
a1electric
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2 Solutions
 
iammorrisonCommented:
Most modern machines have a CPU monitor in the bios, check to see if the CPU is in fact overheating. You may need to pull the CPU fan/heatsink and re-apply some thermal paste (like Arctic Silver) for best thermal conductivity
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tailoreddigitalCommented:
The symptoms all sound like overheating.

I've seen faulty video cards cause this too.  Just for troubleshooting, you should try running with a single video card, then try the other card.
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web_trackerCommented:
If you are getting error messages that the CPU is overheating, you definitely need to investigate why it may be over heating.  As previously mentioned you may need to reapply thermal paste on the cpu, maybe even buy a new heat sink and fan one that will draw more heat away from the CPU. To protect the CPU from burning out the computer is designed to shut down when the CPU reaches a critical temperature. You may need to add another case fan to draw out the heat produced by the two video cards and the cpu.
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nobusCommented:
you may have a poor heat transfer between the cpu and the heatsink; this can be caused by a dislodged heatsink, not making full contact with the cpu
so remove it, and replace the heatpaste
then test again
you can install speedfan to monitor the temps :
http://www.almico.com/speedfan.php

if it still shuts down, the cpu, or mobo may have been fried
test with a minimum setup then, as described here :
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Components/Motherboards/A_1945.html                  (Short-overview-of-how-to-troubleshoot-bad-hardware-when-a-pc-does-not-post)
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
I replaced the heat paste between the cpu and the heat sink, but same result.
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web_trackerCommented:
Due to the two fan failures you had before, it is possible that you may have affected the CPU. Normally before the cpu reaches a critical temperature it will shut down the computer. If the computer is shutdown due to a thermal event, the temperature of the cpu could still rise for a few minutes even after the computer is turned off. The reason is because the fans are no longer turning to draw heat away from the CPU, so the temperature can still rise. This could have affected the cpu. If after receiving a thermal event error you did not wait for enough time for the cpu to cool down before before restarting the computer you could have affected the CPU. If you have a thermal event with the CPU you should let the computer cool down for a minimum of half an hour to an hour. When you are testing the system to see if the fans have solved the problem are you closing up the computer case, or do you leave the cover open? Have you tried installing an additional fan or changing the cpu heat sink and fan? (as suggested). If you have I would look at replacing the CPU as you may have already overheated it, causing your thermal issues.
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
I will ask the owner of the pc if he wants to purchase a new cpu and keep you updated.
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
I'm having trouble finding the exact cpu online.  The bios says "intel core i7 cpu 950 3.07ghz"  - any ideas of what the exact model number for this one should be?  I keep finding 3.1, 3.4ghz, etc in my searches.
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_Commented:
If the numbers on your cpu are BX80601950, then it might also be listed as a 3.06 GHz.

Found a few on ebay:
http://www.ebay.com/ctg/Intel-Core-i7-950-3-06-GHz-Quad-Core-BX80601950-Processor-/74095503

This benchmark says 3.1GHz
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i7+950+%40+3.07GHz&id=837

You need to get the numbers off the cpu itself, instead of the bios. Windows, or a program.
Motherboards vary slightly in the actual speed they run the bus at.
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nobusCommented:
if you have  a similar mobo around, you can also test the cpu on it; or ask a shop to test it for you
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Is it possible that the cpu is damaged, even though windows loads, if only for a few minutes?
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_Commented:
ummmm... it's rare, but possible.  CPU's are usually Go/No Go, but if it was heat stressed from the fans being dead, there is no telling what kind of "flaky" it could pick up.

As a variation on nobus's suggestion, if you have any kind of cpu that fits that motherboard, you should also check that it is not the mobo that got heat stressed.
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nobusCommented:
some tests to perform  : look if it shuts down also when in bios

if it does NOT shut down, test if you can boot up a bootable, or live cd - here some :
http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/                              ultimate boot cd
http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/download.html                  direct link UBCD
http://www.ubcd4win.com/                              ubcd  Win
ftp://mirrors.kernel.org/knoppix-dvd/KNOPPIX_V7.0.5DVD-2012-12-21-EN.iso      Knoppix
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Turns out when I called Intel as their site instructed me, to get  bootable diagnostic tool, the tech went through trouble shooting with me and is sending a replacement cpu under warranty.   I will let you know the results of the new cpu when it gets here in a few days.
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nobusCommented:
did you try the tests i suggested?  and if so, what was the result?
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Got the new CPU today.  I'll let you know the results.
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
As I was getting ready to put the new CPU in, I noticed the socket looked like it was damaged (see attached picture)

I'm assuming this means getting a new mainboard.

My co-worker has said he doesn't want another Intel board.  If we need a new board, do you have any suggestions for a replacement for this board? (Intel DX58S0)
cpu-socket.JPG
cpu-socket---circled.JPG
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web_trackerCommented:
It looks like something accidentally fell onto the socket, when the cpu was removed, ie the heatsink falling onto the socket.... If the damage can not be repaired you are definitely looking at having to replace the mobo.
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Ok, looks like a pin is missing.
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nobusCommented:
i have been able to "repair " a socket like this with magnifying glasses, a fine tweezer tool and a steady hand
but if it broke off - it can't be repaired - but inspect it closely, it can simply have been bent, and pushing it right can fix it
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Still waiting for new mainboard and case to arrive.
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a1electricAuthor Commented:
Probably two problems - the power supply fan not having an opening for air, and the damaged cpu socket.
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