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Posted on 2013-05-30
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Can someone look at my attached screen shot and explain to me what -08:00 truly means in terms of a system timestamp on a Oracle 11g database?  Does this mean that we are 8 hours of GMT?
Timestamp.jpg
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Question by:akdreaming
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by:tailoreddigital
ID: 39209441
Yes,  -08:00 represents the timezone in relation to GMT.   It's another way to say Pacific Time.  So the local time is based in,
timezone
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by:akdreaming
ID: 39209455
Well, we are in Alaska.....on our own time zone.  We are one hour behind Pacific time.  Does it look right?
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by:tailoreddigital
ID: 39209477
Is the database on a system in Alaska? Or could it be remote?

I just ran across this about Alaska's timezone,

"Effective 2007, the local time changes from AKST to AKDT at 02:00 LST to 03:00 LDT on the second Sunday in March and returns at 02:00 LDT to 01:00 LST on the first Sunday in November."

It sounds like it might use -08 between March and November.

FYI,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Time_Zone
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Author Comment

by:akdreaming
ID: 39209500
Yes, everything we have running is in the Alaska timezone.  Nothing hosted outside of Alaska.  The issue we are having is we use an application called Appworx, which runs off of a Oracle database.  The server the Oracle database is running on was upgraded to 11g from 10g.  Appworx seemed to run fine.  Appworx is basically a batch job scheduler.  Then we upgraded the server itself from Windows 2003 Server to Windows 2008R2.  Appworx is having issues.  Can login to application but some jobs are failing due to some sort of timing issue.  Date stamp on database is correct.  Time on server is correct.  Before any of these upgrades, there was no issue with Appworx or timing issues.  We've never had to do anything concerning the timezone subject concerning our database.
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by:tailoreddigital
ID: 39209534
I don't have any experience with Appworx.    I did a bit of researching on this issue but nothing comes up.    Hopefully another expert with the right experience can help.
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by:PortletPaul
ID: 39209645
>>Windows 2003 Server to Windows 2008R2
I'd be double-checking the time/locale settings on the servers - my memory on this is vague but there were some changes in Windows regarding handling daylight savings as well
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by:slightwv (䄆 Netminder)
ID: 39209696
Also check out this:  Setting the Database Time Zone

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e10729/ch4datetime.htm#NLSPG262
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sdstuber earned 500 total points
ID: 39209708
your database server's operating system timezone is set with a -8 hour offset from UTC/GMT

The time zone offset reported by systimestamp has nothing to with the database time zone, which should always be +0:00.

I have no idea why Oracle allows you to set or query that value since there is no value in doing so, and they even note in their own documentation, as slightwv pointed out, that you should just leave it alone at +0:00
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Expert Comment

by:manny17
ID: 39973412
Yes, that's the timezone wrt to GMT
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