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Legal Constructs for the /etc/environment file

Posted on 2013-05-30
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Last Modified: 2013-05-31
Does the export command belong in the /etc/environment file? I'm thinkin' probably not.
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Question by:babyb00mer
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 39210047
Hi,

you don't need to (and you can't) export anything in /etc/environment.
Unlike profile scripts, the environment file is not a shell script and does not accept data in any format other than the Name=Value format.

The information in this file is used for setting up the environment for processes as well as for login shells.

When a new process begins, the exec subroutine makes an array of strings available  that have the form Name=Value.

When you log in, the system sets environment variables from the /etc/environment file before reading your login profile.

wmp
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