Solved

Legal Constructs for the /etc/environment file

Posted on 2013-05-30
1
428 Views
Last Modified: 2013-05-31
Does the export command belong in the /etc/environment file? I'm thinkin' probably not.
0
Comment
Question by:babyb00mer
1 Comment
 
LVL 68

Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 39210047
Hi,

you don't need to (and you can't) export anything in /etc/environment.
Unlike profile scripts, the environment file is not a shell script and does not accept data in any format other than the Name=Value format.

The information in this file is used for setting up the environment for processes as well as for login shells.

When a new process begins, the exec subroutine makes an array of strings available  that have the form Name=Value.

When you log in, the system sets environment variables from the /etc/environment file before reading your login profile.

wmp
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

I have been running these systems for a few years now and I am just very happy with them.   I just wanted to share the manual that I have created for upgrades and other things.  Oooh yes! FreeBSD makes me happy (as a server), no maintenance and I al…
Why Shell Scripting? Shell scripting is a powerful method of accessing UNIX systems and it is very flexible. Shell scripts are required when we want to execute a sequence of commands in Unix flavored operating systems. “Shell” is the command line i…
Learn how to get help with Linux/Unix bash shell commands. Use help to read help documents for built in bash shell commands.: Use man to interface with the online reference manuals for shell commands.: Use man to search man pages for unknown command…
Learn how to navigate the file tree with the shell. Use pwd to print the current working directory: Use ls to list a directory's contents: Use cd to change to a new directory: Use wildcards instead of typing out long directory names: Use ../ to move…

808 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question