Solved

Sub Network within an existing network?

Posted on 2013-05-31
9
252 Views
Last Modified: 2013-06-03
I am working out of a friend's house who has their own network. The current set up is: cable modem goes to my friend's router (an Airport) then a cat5 plugs into the wall jack to supply the wired network through out the house. I am in a separate part of the house away from the current router setup.

What I want to do is plug my router into the wall and have my own sub network where i can use my own DHCP server for my devices.

How can I do this without his DHCP server trying to compete with mine for addressing?

I hope that makes sense!

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:Jonathong
  • 5
  • 3
9 Comments
 
LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:pony10us
ID: 39212043
How is the rest of the house supplied?  Is there a switch somewhere in the home?
 
Existing:  cable modem to router to switch to rest of building

If the cable modem has multiple ports (most do now)

New: cable modem to router 1 and router 2 that each go to a switch that goes to different locations of building

That should isolate the two segments almost completly

A very basic drawing is attached.
ee-multi.vsd
0
 

Author Comment

by:Jonathong
ID: 39212053
Hey Pony,

The coax comes from the wall in their office, into the modem (only one ethernet port and one USB port on back), which then connects to their Airport (router). Then I have an ethernet cable going from the Airport to the network jack in the wall which goes to a switch in the data closet located in the laundry room. That switch distributes to the rest of the wired jacks in the house, including my office.
0
 
LVL 26

Expert Comment

by:pony10us
ID: 39212066
I see - I missed that it was a cable modem and not a DSL modem - my mistake.  DSL comes with 4-6 ethernet ports usually now.

Is the switch a managed switch?

Answer: yes?

Create 2 VLAN's on the switch, one for the port that goes to your office and one for the ports to the rest of the house.

This solution will isolate your network from the rest of the house.

You could put your router after the switch however it isn't necessary.
0
Manage your data center from practically anywhere

The KN8164V features HD resolution of 1920 x 1200, FIPS 140-2 with level 1 security standards and virtual media transmissions at twice the speed. Built for reliability, the KN series provides local console and remote over IP access, ensuring 24/7 availability to all servers.

 

Author Comment

by:Jonathong
ID: 39212072
How do I know if its managed, and if it is how do I set up the vlan?

Thank you!
0
 

Author Comment

by:Jonathong
ID: 39212083
Its actually a netgear ProSafe VPN Firewall. Model FVS318

If at all possible, i dont want to change any thing on his gear.
0
 
LVL 26

Accepted Solution

by:
pony10us earned 500 total points
ID: 39212106
Atually, you should be able to just plug in your router and it will get it's address through DHCP on his network. It will then supply your equipment with it's assigned DHCP string which you can manipulate.

The issue with this set up is that once your traffic leaves your router it will be in the same network as the rest of the building.  

It really comes down to how secure you need to make your network
0
 

Author Comment

by:Jonathong
ID: 39212113
Oh really? His router will assign my router an address, but nothing past my router?


Im not concerned about security at all.
0
 
LVL 46

Expert Comment

by:Craig Beck
ID: 39212706
Yep, pony10us is correct.  Just plug in your router and it will get an IP address from the Airport.  It won't give addresses to anything on your side of the router.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Jonathong
ID: 39216335
Thank you very much for your time!
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Postgres Monitoring System

A PHP and Perl based system to collect and display usage statistics from PostgreSQL databases.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Using in-flight Wi-Fi when you travel? Business travelers beware! In-flight Wi-Fi networks could rip the door right off your digital privacy portal. That’s no joke either, as it might also provide a convenient entrance for bad threat actors.
PRTG Network Monitor lets you monitor your bandwidth usage, so you know who is using up your bandwidth, and what they're using it for.
After creating this article (http://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/23699/Setup-Mikrotik-routers-with-OSPF.html), I decided to make a video (no audio) to show you how to configure the routers and run some trace routes and pings between the 7 sites…
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…

821 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question