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Video Card Question

Posted on 2013-06-01
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Last Modified: 2016-11-23
I am looking to buy a video card for one of my computers. The case is one of the Dell slim designs--as in it's about 4 inches wide. When looking at video cards, some of them are described as "low profile" (e.g. this one). Does "low profile" correspond to a slim tower, or is it just a marketing term for some other aspect of the card? Is there a more accurate term I might look for when examining potential candidates across various sites?

Since I am planning to buy online, I am hoping to get the correct card to start with, so I can avoid having to do returns or exchanges.

Thanks!
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Question by:käµfm³d   👽
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by:tailoreddigital
tailoreddigital earned 250 total points
ID: 39213473
Yes Low-Profile is specifically made for your type of case.
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Frosty555 earned 250 total points
ID: 39213485
+1 for me. That's the right video card for the job. Low-profile means the bracket is half-height. Full-profile brackets and low profile bracket sizes are standardized. The HD5450 is about as slim as it gets, so if anything is going to fit it's this card.

The bracket itself will fit, but you must take care to ensure that there is enough room for the card itself, the heat-sink  etc. to fit inside your case. For example, in an older HP small-form-factor tower I installed an HD5450 in, although the card fit okay it actually blocked a header on the motherboard where the parallel port was plugged in to, so it was not possible to have both installed in the computer simultaneously.
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by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 39213611
I was looking for a consensus (just to be safe!). I split the points evenly since tailoreddigital was first, but Frosty555 gave a slightly more detailed answer. (Had he not done that I would have adjusted the distribution differently.)

Thank you both for the info!
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by:dbrunton
ID: 39213615
Also check power requirements of the card and compare to your power supply.  You've probably got a 220 watt power supply in your computer.  The card probably consumes about 20 watts but check.  The 220 (or whatever, do check) is probably just sufficient.

Also check that you have a slot in the machine for the card.  What you may have is a proprietary slot that is designed for an extension bus rather than a PCI Express slot.  Been fooled that way as well.
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