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IIS Log Timestamp Question

Posted on 2013-06-04
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Last Modified: 2013-06-10
Using the extended log format in IIS we're given the wonderful "time-taken" field.

Given this entry:

2013-06-03 02:00:00 1.2.3.4 GET /file.htm - 443 - 5.6.7.8 (User Agent) 200 0 0 300000

The time-taken is 300000ms, or 5 minutes.

My question is.. did the request begin at 02:00, or did the request begin at 01:55 and end at 02:00?

A Followup question.. if the timestamp represents the end of the request, are there any log parsers that automatically adjust the timestamp to represent the origin of the request?
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Question by:wegee2
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by:Gary
ID: 39218950
The time the request was received
Not sure what you mean by
adjust the timestamp to represent the origin of the request
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Author Comment

by:wegee2
ID: 39218970
I meant if the timestamp represented the end of the request, and in that sample the request instead started at 01:55, I wanted to convert it.

If the timestamp is already representing the beginning of the request, no conversion is needed and my followup question is moot.

I am now curious though if a request takes 5 minutes to process, how long does IIS buffer the information before writing to the log file.. since it can't write the "time-taken" until the request has finished.  I guess that's another question for another day.
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by:Gary
ID: 39219004
The time is when the request was received i.e. it is the start time. So in your example the request would have ended at 02:05:00
As for the second part, I'm not 100% sure.
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Author Comment

by:wegee2
ID: 39219409
I did some testing to try and answer the second part, and in doing so I'm afraid I'm going to have to disagree with you on the first part.

Take this log entry from my test:

2013-06-04 15:21:15 ::1 GET /timeout.asp |-|ASP_0113|Script_timed_out 80 - ::1 (User Agent snipped) 500 0 0 194821

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This test is a specific .asp script I wrote with an infinite loop and a 180 second timeout.  I started it as close to 15:18:00 as my mouse-clicking finger could get.

Notice the timestamp is 3 minutes, 15 seconds after when I started it.  And look at the time-taken.  194821 is a few ms shy of 3 minutes, 15 seconds.

So I believe the timestamp is the end of the request (and the time of writing to the log file), not the actual start of the request to IIS.

If you have any documentation to both explain this result and assert your idea, please share it, because I sure as heck couldn't find any before I posted the question.
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by:Gary
ID: 39219477
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wegee2 earned 0 total points
ID: 39219912
I read that, but it seems to be incorrect, or perhaps worded poorly.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mike/archive/2008/11/13/time-vs-time-taken-fields-in-iis-logging.aspx

Going from my real-world testing, and from this posting by a MS person, I am inclined to go with what he says about the log time being when the log entry itself is created (at the end of the response, not the beginning).  

Unfortunately, IIS logging by default doesn't include the time down to the millisecond, so I'm going to have some slight inaccuracy to my resultant forensics.
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Author Closing Comment

by:wegee2
ID: 39234077
Having done more testing and finding the above blog by a MS employee on the subject, I'm content with this answer.
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