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COUNTIFS formula not counting correctly

Posted on 2013-06-05
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Last Modified: 2013-06-06
Hello, I'm using:

=SUM(COUNTIFS($P:$P, "Program Planning & Policy",$O:$O, {"AZ","CA","DC","IN","LA","ME","MI","NC","NY","PR","TX","VT","WA"},$S:$S, {"Reg.","IS"}))

To try an count some data, however it seem if I try to add the add the additional criteria to the last range of "IS" the formula no longer works.... If I'm just counting for "Reg." or "IS" individually it counts correctly....

Why can't I count the last range for 2 criteria... is there an alternate work around apart from doing two COUNTIFS ala:

=SUM(COUNTIFS($P:$P, "Program Planning & Policy",$S:$S, "Reg.",$O:$O, {"AZ","CA","DC","IN","LA","ME","MI","NC","NY","PR","TX","VT","WA"}),COUNTIFS($P:$P, "Program Planning & Policy",$S:$S, "IS",$O:$O, {"AZ","CA","DC","IN","LA","ME","MI","NC","NY","PR","TX","VT","WA"}))
Dummy.xlsx
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Question by:-Polak
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6 Comments
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:NBVC
ID: 39223042
It's because the criteria arrays aren't the same size....

Try:

=SUMPRODUCT((P1:P10="Program Planning & Policy")*(ISNUMBER(MATCH(O1:O10,{"AZ","CA","DC","IN","LA","ME","MI","NC","NY","PR","TX","VT","WA"},0)))*(ISNUMBER(MATCH(S1:S10,{"Reg.","IS"},0))))

adjust ranges to suit... but do not use unnecessarily large ranges.
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LVL 50

Accepted Solution

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barry houdini earned 2000 total points
ID: 39223118
When you have 2 multi-element criteria ranges in COUNTIFS one needs to be separated by commas and one by semi-colons (assuming UK/US regional settings), so if you change the last comma , to a semi-colon ; your original formula will work, i.e.

=SUM(COUNTIFS($P:$P, "Program Planning & Policy",$O:$O, {"AZ","CA","DC","IN","LA","ME","MI","NC","NY","PR","TX","VT","WA"},$S:$S, {"Reg.";"IS"}))

If you have 3 or more multi-element criteria you need to use something like NB_VC's suggestion

regards, barry
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LVL 1

Author Closing Comment

by:-Polak
ID: 39223154
Thanks for the in-depth explaination of "why" and the cleaner solution.
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:NBVC
ID: 39223177
Hey barry,

Thanks.. you taught me something too :)
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LVL 50

Expert Comment

by:barry houdini
ID: 39223259
Thanks, note that even if the criteria arrays are the same size like this:

=SUM(COUNTIFS(A:A,{"a","b","c"},B:B,{"x","y","z"}))

then with comma separators for both you will only count a/x, b/y and c/z combinations. To count all combinations you still need to have commas for one and semi-colons for the other like this:

=SUM(COUNTIFS(A:A,{"a";"b";"c"},B:B,{"x","y","z"}))

regards, barry
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:NBVC
ID: 39223536
Oh, I see.  Thanks again for elaborating.  When I tested I got the correct result without realizing that they were aligned as you mentioned.  :)
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